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Department of English Announces Student Award Winners

2017

The Department of English is host to many gifted student writers and teachers. Thanks to the generosity of various donors, annual prizes are awarded for outstanding work in poetry, fiction, critical writing, and instruction. We are pleased to announce our 2016 - 2017 student award winners below.

The David L. Picket '84 Summer Fellowship in Creative Writing was awarded to graduate students Rocio Anica, Mario Giannone, Annie Goold, Jasmine Jay, Shane Kowalski, Cary Marcous, Michael Prior, Leo Rios.

The Guilford Essay Prize, given to the doctoral student in any field whose thesis is judged to display the highest excellence in English prose, went to Stephen David Thompson (English) for “Modernism from Text to Work: Personality, Poetic Development, and the Study of Literature.”

The Martin Sampson Teaching Fellowship acknowledges the importance of one of the most vital parts of the profession of literature, the teaching of writing and reading to undergraduates. The recipients were graduate students Jessica Abel, Lanre Akinsiku, Amber Harding, Jonathan Reinhardt, and Emily Rials.

The Joseph F. Martino '53 Lectureship in Undergraduate Teaching, which supports English graduate student seminars offering some form of a literary historical survey in the framework of a writing course, was awarded to Kaylin O’Dell.

The Corson-Browning Poetry Prize was awarded to graduate student Arkaye Kierulf for “The Great Traveling Hunger” and undergraduate student Lylla Younes for “Flux.”  Honorable mention was awarded to graduate student Ezra Feldman for “Mountain and 9 others.”

The Robert Chasen Memorial Poetry Prize was awarded to: 1st place, undergraduate student Jesse Gonzalez for “Havana From My Bedroom Window”; 2nd place, undergraduate student Naima Kazmi for “(un)corporeal”; and honorable mention, to undergraduate student Alyssa Findley for “London Poem and Other poems.”

The Dorothy Sugarman Poetry Prize was awarded to undergraduate student Brian Young for “Say.”

The Arthur Lynn Andrews Prize graduate student winners were: 1st place, Shane Kowalski for “How There Are People”; 2nd place, Neal Giannone for “Onymus”; and honorable mention was awarded to Christopher Berardino for “Dog Bait.” The Arthur Lynn Andrews Prize undergraduate winners were: 1st place, Becca Schwartz for “To Swallow a Fly”; 2nd place, Max Van Zile for “Choice”; and honorable mention was awarded to Elie Kirshner for “Character of Convenience.”

The George Harmon Coxe Award in Creative Writing Fiction winners were 1st place, Ali Jenkins for “Something Lost”; 2nd place, Christopher Lombardo for “Fa una bella figura//The Retroactive Immigrant (And the Time He Journeyed Home)”; honorable mentions were awarded to Yvette Ndlovu for “The Pulling” and Rebecca Vincent for “Clockwork.”

The George Harmon Coxe Award in Creative Writing Poetry winners were 1st place, Yvette Ndlovu for “Suitcase”; 2nd place, Alexander Bilzerian for “Advice for Praying Along Moon Lines”; honorable mention was awarded to Sylvia Onorato for “Satellite and Other Poems.”

The Barnes Shakespeare Prize co-winners were undergraduates Michaela Lee for “‘Made true and good’: The Wordy Ghost of Hamlet” and Corey Shapiro for “It’s Greek to Me: A Review of the Performative Role in Law and its Athenian Origins”; honorable mention was awarded to undergraduate Julia Shebek for “By this Hand: An Analysis of Three Playwright Figures in Shakespeare.”

The M. H. Abrams Thesis Prize went to Jagravi Dave, “‘Near-Perceptible’; Failed Dictations and Inexact Reproductions in Theresa Hak Kyung Cha’s DICTEE”; Jacob Wang; “Mimetic Modernism: History, Technology, and Language in Hart Crane’s The Bridge”; and Austin Ward, “From Out Along the Trace: C.S. Giscombe’s Poetics of location in Giscome Road.” Honorable mention went to Matthew Ormseth, “‘To Somehow See the One Thing’: The Interrupted Poetry of George Oppen and the Usefulness of Poem-Making.”

The Moses Coit Tyler Award for the best essay by a graduate or undergraduate student in the fields of American History, literature, or folklore went to undergraduate student Rachel Mitnick for “Helsinki Watch: The Transatlantic Fight for Human Rights in the Soviet Union.”

For more information regarding Department of English prize competitions, please click here.

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