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Fall 2019 Schedule

For a calendar view, please visit the University's English Events Calendar.

ALL EVENTS ARE FREE and open to the public



Reading by Jenny Xie
Thursday, September 19, 4:30 p.m.
Hollis E. Cornell Auditorium, 132 Goldwin Smith Hall

The Fall 2019 Barbara & David Zalaznick Creative Writing Reading Series kicks off with a reading by acclaimed Chinese American poet & National Book Award finalist Jenny Xie.

Jenny Xie was born in Hefei, China, and raised in New Jersey. She is the author of Eye Level, which was selected by Juan Felipe Herrera for the Walt Whitman Award of the Academy of American Poets. Eye Level also received the Holmes National Poetry Prize from Princeton University, was named a finalist for the National Book Award and a PEN Open Book Award, and was longlisted for the Dylan Thomas Prize. Her chapbook, Nowhere to Arrive, won the Drinking Gourd Prize. Xie holds degrees from Princeton University and NYU, and has received grants and support from Kundiman, the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown, the Elizabeth George Foundation, and Poets & Writers. Her work appears in POETRY, The New York Times Magazine, and Tin House, among other publications. She has taught creative writing at NYU and Princeton University, and currently lives in New York.

Reception and book signing to follow in the English Lounge, 258 Goldwin Smith Hall

American Sign Language (ASL) interpretation will be provided for this reading.


English Department Roundtable: TBD
September 20, 2:30 p.m.
English Lounge, 258 Goldwin Smith Hall
Moderator: TBD

Copies of the paper are available in the English Department Roundtable (EDR) mailbox in the English Department mailroom (GS 250, on the far right of the wall of English grad student boxes) and on the EDR Blackboard site

Refreshments will be served

The English Department Roundtable is a forum for graduate students in the English Department to share ideas across a wide variety of fields, time periods, and methodologies.  Open to students at all stages of the program, the EDR gives us an opportunity to discuss our work in an informal setting with a group of our peers, to give and receive feedback about current projects, and to learn about the work being done by our colleagues. At a time in which the tremendous diversity of literary study has made it increasingly difficult to grasp the discipline as a whole, the purpose of the EDR is to foster a greater sense of intellectual community and cohesion within Cornell’s English Department, and to strengthen our work through increased collaboration with our peers.

Sponsored by the Class of 1916 Chair


MorganFest: A Robert Morgan Celebration
Thursday, October 3, 8:30 a.m. - 6:30 p.m.
*Silver Birch Suite, Statler Hall (5th Floor Tower Suite)
*unless otherwise noted - see directions to Silver Birch Suite below schedule

The Department of English is planning a major celebration to honor Robert Morgan. The event will include panels, a conversation, a reading, and other tributes to one of Cornell’s most beloved professors. An award-winning poet, fiction writer, novelist, historian and biographer and scholar, Morgan remains an inspiring teacher and beloved colleague. Please join us in celebrating his remarkable achievements and profound influence in American Letters.

8:30 a.m. - Coffee and Bagels
9:00 a.m. - Welcome Remarks
9:30 a.m. - On Morgan’s Poetry

Panel featuring:
Bhisham Bherwani (Independent scholar & writer)
Jesse Graves (East Tennessee State University)
John Lang (Emory & Henry College (emeritus))
Robert West (Mississippi State University)
Moderated by: Roger Gilbert (Cornell University)

11:00 a.m. - Coffee Break
11:30 a.m. - On Morgan’s Prose 

Panel featuring:
Nicole Drewitz-Crockett (Emory & Henry College)
Martha Greene Eads (Eastern Mennonite University)
Rebecca Godwin (Barton College)
Randall Wilhelm (Anderson University)
Moderated by: Paul Sawyer (Cornell University)

1:00 p.m. - Lunch Provided
2:00 p.m. - A Conversation with Robert Morgan

Featuring:
Alice Fulton (Cornell University)
Randall G. Kenan (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)
Kenneth A. McClane (Cornell University (emeritus))
Moderated by: Stuart Davis (Cornell University)

4:30 p.m. - MorganFest Reading
*
Rhodes-Rawlings Auditorium, G70 Klarman Hall

The Fall 2019 Barbara & David Zalaznick Creative Writing Reading Series continues with this celebration in honor of poet, novelist, and professor Robert Morgan. Morgan and three of his former students will read from their own works:

Robert Morgan, Poet & Novelist
Robert Morgan was born on October 3, 1944 in Hendersonville, North Carolina, near the Blue Ridge Mountains. His early studies included music, science, and engineering, but writing proved to be his truest passion. His first published books were collections of poems, earthy in style and grounded in the rhythms of work. Though he continues to write poetry, Morgan has devoted much of his creative energy to short stories and novels that draw on the rich history of Appalachia, including the bestseller Gap Creek (1999) and Chasing the North Star (2016). Most recently Morgan has turned to biography, on subjects ranging from Daniel Boone to Edgar Allan Poe. Since 1971 he has taught at Cornell University, where he is now the Kappa Alpha Professor of English and much loved as a writer, poet, colleague, and mentor. 

Elizabeth Holmes MFA '87, Poet
Elizabeth Holmes is the author of three books of poetry, most recently Passing Worlds: Tahiti in the Era of Captain Cook (LSU Press, 2018). She lives in Ithaca, New York, and works as a writer at Cornell University.

Lynn Powell MFA '80, Poet & Nonfiction Writer
Lynn Powell has published three books of poetry, including Season of the Second Thought, and a nonfiction book, Framing Innocence. Her honors include an NEA Fellowship, the Brittingham and the Felix Pollak Prizes in poetry, and the Studs & Ida Terkel Award for nonfiction. She teaches at Oberlin College.

Robert Schultz MFA '76, MA '78, PhD '81, Author & Artist
Robert Schultz’s work includes three poetry collections, a novel, a nonfiction work, and an art book. He has received an NEA Award, The Virginia Quarterly Review’s Balch Prize, and Cornell’s Corson Bishop Poetry Prize. Schultz’s artwork is held by the U.S. Library of Congress, the University of Virginia, and private collectors.  

American Sign Language (ASL) interpretation will be provided for this reading.

6:15 p.m. - Reception and Book Signing
*
English Lounge, 258 Goldwin Smith Hall

Directions to Silver Birch Suite (5th Floor Tower Suite)There is only one elevator in Statler Hall that can take you to the 5th floor Tower Suite, and the only room on that floor is the Silver Birch. Statler Hotel and Statler Hall staff refer to the Silver Birch Suite (donor name) as the 5th Floor Tower Suite.

- From Statler Hotel lobby, when facing the stairs that lead from the lobby to Taverna Banfi, follow signage for MorganFest Silver Birch Suite (5th Floor Tower Suite) to the left down the hallway and continue to follow the free-standing signage through the Hotel towards Statler Hall. Pass through the doors into Statler Hall, which will bring you out towards the Statler Auditorium, and follow the hallway in front of you, and to the right of the Auditorium, towards the back wall that says “SHA Tower”. Take the elevator on the right near the end of the hallway to the fifth floor, exit to the left, and enter the Silver Birch Suite (room sign says “Multipurpose Room 589”).

- From East Avenue, enter Statler Hall, follow the staircase up and, when facing the Statler Auditorium, take the hallway to the right of the Auditorium, towards the back wall that says “SHA Tower”. Take the elevator on the right near the end of the hallway to the fifth floor, exit to the left, and enter the Silver Birch Suite (room sign says “Multipurpose Room 589”).

- From Statler Drive, enter Statler Hall, following the hallway to the Statler Auditorium. When facing the Statler Auditorium, take the hallway to the right of the Auditorium, towards the back wall that says “SHA Tower”. Take the elevator on the right near the end of the hallway to the fifth floor, exit to the left, and enter the Silver Birch Suite (room sign says “Multipurpose Room 589”).

For campus parking information please visit https://www.cornell.edu/visit/parking/


English Department Roundtable: TBD
October 18, 2:30 p.m.
English Lounge, 258 Goldwin Smith Hall
Moderator: TBD

Copies of the paper are available in the English Department Roundtable (EDR) mailbox in the English Department mailroom (GS 250, on the far right of the wall of English grad student boxes) and on the EDR Blackboard site

Refreshments will be served

The English Department Roundtable is a forum for graduate students in the English Department to share ideas across a wide variety of fields, time periods, and methodologies.  Open to students at all stages of the program, the EDR gives us an opportunity to discuss our work in an informal setting with a group of our peers, to give and receive feedback about current projects, and to learn about the work being done by our colleagues. At a time in which the tremendous diversity of literary study has made it increasingly difficult to grasp the discipline as a whole, the purpose of the EDR is to foster a greater sense of intellectual community and cohesion within Cornell’s English Department, and to strengthen our work through increased collaboration with our peers.

Sponsored by the Class of 1916 Chair


Reading by Desiree Cooper
Thursday, October 24, 4:30 p.m.
Rhodes-Rawlings Auditorium, G70 Klarman Hall

The Fall 2019 Barbara & David Zalaznick Creative Writing Reading Series comes to a close with a reading by Pulitzer Prize-nominated journalist & women's rights activist Desiree Cooper.

Desiree Cooper is a 2015 Kresge Artist Fellow, former attorney and Pulitzer Prize-nominated journalist. Her debut collection of flash fiction, Know the Mother, has won numerous awards including 2017 Next Generation Indie Book Award. Cooper’s fiction, poetry and essays have appeared in The Best Small Fictions 2018CallalooMichigan Quarterly ReviewHypertext Review, and Best African American Fiction 2010, among other publications. In 2018, she wrote, produced and co-directed “The Choice,” a short film about reproductive rights and recipient of the 2019 Berlin Flash Film Festival’s Outstanding Achievement Award, and an Award of Merit from the Los Angeles Best Short Film Festival. Cooper was a founding board member of Cave Canem, a national residency for black poets.

Reception and book signing to follow in the English Lounge, 258 Goldwin Smith Hall

American Sign Language (ASL) interpretation will be provided for this reading.


English Department Roundtable: TBD
November 8, 2:30 p.m.
English Lounge, 258 Goldwin Smith Hall
Moderator: TBD

Copies of the paper are available in the English Department Roundtable (EDR) mailbox in the English Department mailroom (GS 250, on the far right of the wall of English grad student boxes) and on the EDR Blackboard site

Refreshments will be served

The English Department Roundtable is a forum for graduate students in the English Department to share ideas across a wide variety of fields, time periods, and methodologies.  Open to students at all stages of the program, the EDR gives us an opportunity to discuss our work in an informal setting with a group of our peers, to give and receive feedback about current projects, and to learn about the work being done by our colleagues. At a time in which the tremendous diversity of literary study has made it increasingly difficult to grasp the discipline as a whole, the purpose of the EDR is to foster a greater sense of intellectual community and cohesion within Cornell’s English Department, and to strengthen our work through increased collaboration with our peers.

Sponsored by the Class of 1916 Chair


The Philip Freund Prize for Creative Writing Alumni Reading by Dorothy Chan, Nicholas Friedman, Ruth Joffre, & Daniel Peña
Thursday, November 14, 4:30 p.m.
Hollis E. Cornell Auditorium, 132 Goldwin Smith Hall

Recipients of the 2019 Philip Freund Prize for Creative Writing for excellence in publication will read from their works:

Dorothy Chan BA '12, Poet
Dorothy Chan is the author of Revenge of the Asian WomanAttack of the Fifty-Foot Centerfold, and the chapbook Chinatown Sonnets. She was a 2014 finalist for the Ruth Lilly and Dorothy Sargent Rosenberg Poetry Fellowship. Chan is the Poetry Editor of Hobart and an Assistant Professor of Creative Writing at the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire. Visit her website at dorothypoetry.com.

Nicholas Friedman MFA '12, Poet
Nicholas Friedman is the author of Petty Theft, winner of The New Criterion Poetry Prize. His poems have appeared in The New York TimesPOETRYYale Review, and other venues. A former Wallace Stegner Fellow, he is also the recipient of a Ruth Lilly Fellowship from the Poetry Foundation. He lives with his wife and son in Syracuse.

Ruth Joffre BA '11, Author
Ruth Joffre is the author of the story collection Night Beast. Her work has appeared or is forthcoming in Kenyon ReviewGulf CoastPrairie SchoonerLightspeedThe Masters ReviewNashville ReviewCutBank, and elsewhere. She lives in Seattle and teaches at the Hugo House.

Daniel Peña MFA '12, Novelist
Daniel Peña is a Pushcart Prize-winning writer and Assistant Professor in the Department of English at the University of Houston-Downtown. A Fulbright-Garcia Robles Scholar and former Picador Guest Professor in Leipzig, Germany, his writing has appeared in PloughsharesThe GuardianKenyon Review, and NBC News among other outlets. His novel, Bang, is out now from Arte Publico Press.

Philip Freund ’29, MA ’32, was a novelist, short-story writer, poet, documentary film writer, playwright, television dramatist, essayist, and literary critic. The Philip Freund Prize for Creative Writing honors graduates upon their successful publication. 

Reception and book signing to follow in the English Lounge, 258 Goldwin Smith Hall

American Sign Language (ASL) interpretation will be provided for this reading.


The Paul Gottschalk Memorial Lecture by Richard Rambuss
"Milton, Spenser, Shakespeare, and Carnival—New Orleans Style" 

Thursday, November 21, 4:30 p.m.
Guerlac Room, A.D. White House

Literature may be far from mind now when one thinks of what’s billed as the greatest bacchanal in the US: Mardi Gras in New Orleans. Yet a learned deployment of English literature—especially Renaissance literature—played a structuring role in a denotatively Anglo-American endeavor to appropriate and “elevate” Carnival traditions in multicultural New Orleans. This lecture focuses on the all-male, secret society Carnival organizations founded in the mid- to late-nineteenth century, beginning with the Mystick Krewe of Comus (named after Milton’s masque), which innovated the elaborate, expensive public parades and private tableaux balls for which New Orleans Carnival has come to be known. The themes for their fanciful, erudite Mardi Gras pageantry were often derived from poetry and drama. This lecture reflects upon the performative afterlife of English Renaissance literature in an American context. But it does so outside the usual Northeastern purview to consider Milton, Spenser, and Shakespeare in the Deep South—in New Orleans, which (as Robert D. Abrahams puts it) “has provided alternative ways of thinking about almost everything in American life.”

Richard Rambuss is chair of the English Department at Brown University, where he is Nicholas Brown Professor of Oratory and Belles Lettres. His teaching and writing travels back and forth between early modern literature and contemporary culture, especially film. Much of his interest in the old and the new turns on questions of gender and sexuality. He has published three books, most recently The English Poems of Richard Crashaw, the first new scholarly edition of this ecstatic seventeenth-century poet in fifty years. He has also just completed a manuscript on men and masculinity in extreme circumstances in the work of Stanley Kubrick, which is forthcoming from Fordham University Press. He is now working on a new book titled Mardi Gras Milton: The Golden Age of New Orleans Carnival and English Renaissance Literature.

The Gottschalk Memorial Lecture was established in memory of Paul Gottschalk, Professor of English at Cornell, scholar of British Renaissance literature and author of "The Meanings of Hamlet" (1972). He died in 1977 at the age of 38.

Free and open to the public

Reception to follow in the A.D. White House

This lecture will be followed by a graduate student seminar with Richard Rambuss on November 22


Seminar by Richard Rambuss
"Milton's Christ" 

Friday, November 22, 11:00 a.m.
English Lounge, 258 Goldwin Smith Hall

Richard Rambuss is chair of the English Department at Brown University, where he is Nicholas Brown Professor of Oratory and Belles Lettres. His teaching and writing travels back and forth between early modern literature and contemporary culture, especially film. Much of his interest in the old and the new turns on questions of gender and sexuality. He has published three books, most recently The English Poems of Richard Crashaw, the first new scholarly edition of this ecstatic seventeenth-century poet in fifty years. He has also just completed a manuscript on men and masculinity in extreme circumstances in the work of Stanley Kubrick, which is forthcoming from Fordham University Press. He is now working on a new book titled Mardi Gras Milton: The Golden Age of New Orleans Carnival and English Renaissance Literature.

RSVP to lbl3@cornell.edu to sign up for the seminar and receive the readings

Refreshments will be served



English Department Roundtable: TBD
November 22, 2:30 p.m.
English Lounge, 258 Goldwin Smith Hall
Moderator: TBD

Copies of the paper are available in the English Department Roundtable (EDR) mailbox in the English Department mailroom (GS 250, on the far right of the wall of English grad student boxes) and on the EDR Blackboard site

Refreshments will be served

The English Department Roundtable is a forum for graduate students in the English Department to share ideas across a wide variety of fields, time periods, and methodologies.  Open to students at all stages of the program, the EDR gives us an opportunity to discuss our work in an informal setting with a group of our peers, to give and receive feedback about current projects, and to learn about the work being done by our colleagues. At a time in which the tremendous diversity of literary study has made it increasingly difficult to grasp the discipline as a whole, the purpose of the EDR is to foster a greater sense of intellectual community and cohesion within Cornell’s English Department, and to strengthen our work through increased collaboration with our peers.

Sponsored by the Class of 1916 Chair


English Department Roundtable: TBD
December 6, 2:30 p.m.
English Lounge, 258 Goldwin Smith Hall
Moderator: TBD

Copies of the paper are available in the English Department Roundtable (EDR) mailbox in the English Department mailroom (GS 250, on the far right of the wall of English grad student boxes) and on the EDR Blackboard site

Refreshments will be served

The English Department Roundtable is a forum for graduate students in the English Department to share ideas across a wide variety of fields, time periods, and methodologies.  Open to students at all stages of the program, the EDR gives us an opportunity to discuss our work in an informal setting with a group of our peers, to give and receive feedback about current projects, and to learn about the work being done by our colleagues. At a time in which the tremendous diversity of literary study has made it increasingly difficult to grasp the discipline as a whole, the purpose of the EDR is to foster a greater sense of intellectual community and cohesion within Cornell’s English Department, and to strengthen our work through increased collaboration with our peers.

Sponsored by the Class of 1916 Chair



Spring 2019 Schedule

For a calendar view, please visit the University's English Events Calendar.
To add English events to your online calendar, see the "Subscribe To These Results” field of the University's English Events Calendar (bottom right of page) and select your calendar type. Also see Exporting Events (Google, Outlook Calendar Notes).



The Richard Cleaveland Memorial Reading by Robert Morgan & Ernesto Quiñónez
Thursday, February 7, 4:30 p.m.
Rhodes-Rawlings Auditorium, G70 Klarman Hall

The Spring 2019 Barbara & David Zalaznick Creative Writing Reading Series kicks off with the Richard Cleaveland Memorial Reading featuring Robert Morgan, poet & novelist, and Ernesto Quiñónez, writer.

Robert Morgan is the author of fifteen books of poems, most recently Terroir and Dark Energy. He has published eleven works of fiction, including Gap Creek and Chasing the North Star. Nonfiction works include Boone: A Biography and Lions of the West. Recipient of awards from the Guggenheim Foundation and the American Academy of Arts and Letters, he is a member of the Fellowship of Southern Writers. A native of western North Carolina, he is currently Kappa Alpha Professor of English at Cornell University.

Ernesto Quiñónez is a product of public education, from kindergarten to his Masters at the City College of New York. He is the author of the novel Bodega Dreams and an associate professor of English at Cornell University.

The Richard Cleaveland Memorial Reading was created in 2002 by family and friends of Richard Cleaveland, Cornell Class of ’74, to honor his memory.

Free and open to the public

Reception and book signing to follow in the English Lounge, 258 Goldwin Smith Hall



Coffee Break with the Profs featuring Ben Ortiz
February 13, 12:15-1:10 p.m.
English Lounge, 258 Goldwin Smith Hall

Ben Ortiz is the Assistant Curator of the Cornell Hip Hop Collection, which is part of Cornell University Library's Rare and Manuscript Collections division. The CHHC is the world's most extensive research archive on Hip Hop music and culture (a very broad subject through which a wide diversity of topics can be explored). In addition to his position with Cornell Hip Hop Collection, Ben is also active in the local music scene, and can be found rocking dance floors as his alter ego, DJ ha-MEEN. 

Coffee Break with the Profs (formerly called Books Sandwiched In) is a monthly lunch series for Cornell undergraduates, designed to bring faculty and undergraduate students together in an informal and cozy setting to discuss literature. You need not be an English Major to attend. Join in this informal discussion with faculty, meet other students interested in literature, and get free coffee, too!



English Department Roundtable: CANCELLED
February 15, 2:30 p.m.
English Lounge, 258 Goldwin Smith Hall



The 40th Anniversary of the Paul Gottschalk Memorial Lecture by Suzanne Conklin Akbari
“Chaucer’s Periodization”
Thursday, February 28, 4:30 p.m.
Guerlac Room, A.D. White House

To talk about “Chaucer’s periodization” often means to ask how we ourselves think of Chaucer: as a quintessentially “medieval” poet, or as a harbinger of the “modern.” Instead, this lecture explores how Chaucer and his contemporaries saw their own place in time, focusing on The House of Fame, the Knight’s Tale, the Man of Law’s Tale, and Troilus and Criseyde, and asking questions such as the following: Does Chaucer present a linear or a cyclical view of history? To what extent does each national history stand on its own? And what’s the place of the individual subject within Chaucer’s periodization?

Suzanne Conklin Akbari is Director of the Centre for Medieval Studies at the University of Toronto. She has written books on optics and allegory (Seeing Through the Veil) and European views of Islam and the Orient (Idols in the East), and edited collections on travel literature (Marco Polo), Mediterranean Studies (A Sea of Languages), and somatic histories (The Ends of the Body). She is finishing up a monograph titled Small Change: Metaphor and Metamorphosis in Chaucer and Christine de Pizan, and working on another project on premodern ideas of periodization as seen in universal histories, maps, and diagrams (The Shape of Time). She is also an editor of the Norton Anthology of World Literature. 

The Gottschalk Memorial Lecture was established in memory of Paul Gottschalk, Professor of English at Cornell, scholar of British Renaissance literature and author of "The Meanings of Hamlet" (1972). He died in 1977 at the age of 38.

Free and open to the public

Reception to follow in the A.D. White House

This lecture will be followed by a graduate student seminar with Suzanne Conklin Akbari on March 1



Seminar by Suzanne Conklin Akbari
"Mapping Ethiopia within Medieval Studies"
Friday, March 1, 11:30a.m.-1:00p.m. 
English Lounge, 258 Goldwin Smith Hall

"Mapping Ethiopia within Medieval Studies": The place of medieval Ethiopia can be conceived within the overarching framework of a 'global' Medieval Studies, or in a way that draws upon Mediterranean Studies' focus on connectivity and regional identities. Either approach must reckon with the long history of western representations of Ethiopia, which drew upon religious and racial constructions to imagine a people who were at once remote and monstrous, deformed by the heat of the sun and yet situated at the very heart of an alluring fantasy of Judeo-Christian identity. Drawing especially on medieval maps, encyclopedias, and travel narratives, we will consider what Ethiopia represented for medieval Europe, and what 'medieval Ethiopia' might mean for us today.

RSVP to lbl3@cornell.edu to sign up for the seminar and receive the readings



African American Literature Series: Lecture by Nahum Dimitri Chandler
“W. E. B. Du Bois and the Sacred Music of The Souls of Black Folk: Essays and Sketches (1903) --Across the Centuries.”
March 7, 4:30 p.m.
English Lounge, 258 Goldwin Smith Hall

Nahum Dimitri Chandler, Professor of English and African American Studies at the University of California-Irvine, will give a lecture in the African American Studies Speakers Series,  “W. E. B. Du Bois and the Sacred Music of The Souls of Black Folk: Essays and Sketches (1903)--Across the Centuries.”

Background texts are available for potential audience members at this link: https://goo.gl/t7Req

Nahum Dimitri Chandler serves on the faculty of the School of Humanities at the University of California, Irvine. From August 2018 to July 2020 he will serve as faculty director of the University of California Education Abroad Program (UCEAP) programs in Japan, while also serving as a Visiting Professor of the Department of Humanities, College of Liberal Arts, at the International Christian University, Mitaka (Tokyo), Japan, the host institution of the UCEAP Tokyo Study Center. Known in the formal academic context as an historian of the human sciences and as a theorist within contemporary critical thought – especially as a scholar of the work of W. E. B. Du Bois and as a critical interpreter of the work of Jacques Derrida, along with a singular engagement with the work of late composer, poet, and pianist Cecil Taylor (who was the 2013 Kyoto Prize laureate in Arts and Philosophy) whom he hosted for six months as an artist in residence while director of the Program in Comparative American Studies at Johns Hopkins University – Professor Chandler has lectured in the majority of the states in the United States, in Canada, several parts of Europe (for example, Germany, England, the Netherlands, Scotland, Italy, Hungary, and the Czech Republic) and in Asia (Japan and China), and has undertaken scholarly visits to Africa (Zimbabwe and Nigeria) over the past twenty-five years.

This lecture is the first spring semester installment in a year-long series of talks focusing on current topics in African American literary studies: the 2018-19 African American Studies Speaker Series. The talks in the series are supported by the Department of English and College of Arts and Sciences. Next in the series, A Lecture by Hortense Spillers, M.H. Abrams Distinguished Visiting Professor, on March 21.



English Department Roundtable: TBD
March 8, 2:30 p.m.
English Lounge, 258 Goldwin Smith Hall
Moderator: TBD

Copies of the paper are available in the English Department Roundtable (EDR) mailbox in the English Department mailroom (GS 250, on the far right of the wall of English grad student boxes) and on the EDR Blackboard site

Refreshments will be served

The English Department Roundtable is a forum for graduate students in the English Department to share ideas across a wide variety of fields, time periods, and methodologies.  Open to students at all stages of the program, the EDR gives us an opportunity to discuss our work in an informal setting with a group of our peers, to give and receive feedback about current projects, and to learn about the work being done by our colleagues. At a time in which the tremendous diversity of literary study has made it increasingly difficult to grasp the discipline as a whole, the purpose of the EDR is to foster a greater sense of intellectual community and cohesion within Cornell’s English Department, and to strengthen our work through increased collaboration with our peers.

Sponsored by the Class of 1916 Chair



Coffee Break with the Profs
March 20, 12:15-1:10 p.m.
English Lounge, 258 Goldwin Smith Hall

English Majors! Career Services comes to you!

Arts & Sciences Career Development will have an open discussion about:
-Opportunities for English majors
-What English majors have done in the past
-How to leverage your English degree for employment or graduate education
-Answer your questions!

Coffee Break with the Profs (formerly called Books Sandwiched In) is a monthly lunch series for Cornell undergraduates, designed to bring faculty and undergraduate students together in an informal and cozy setting to discuss literature. You need not be an English Major to attend. Join in this informal discussion with faculty, meet other students interested in literature, and get free coffee, too!



Reading by Elissa Washuta, Nonfiction Writer
Thursday, March 14, 4:30 p.m.
Rhodes-Rawlings Auditorium, G70 Klarman Hall

The Spring 2019 Barbara & David Zalaznick Creative Writing Reading Series continues with a reading by nonfiction writer Elissa Washuta.

Elissa Washuta is a member of the Cowlitz Indian Tribe and a nonfiction writer. She is the author of Starvation Mode and My Body Is a Book of Rules, named a finalist for the Washington State Book Award. With Theresa Warburton, she is co-editor of the anthology Shapes of Native Nonfiction: Collected Essays by Contemporary Writers. She has received fellowships and awards from the National Endowment for the Arts, Artist Trust, 4Culture, Potlatch Fund, and Hugo House. Washuta is an assistant professor of creative writing at The Ohio State University.

Free and open to the public

Reception and book signing to follow in the English Lounge, 258 Goldwin Smith Hall



A Lecture by Hortense Spillers, M.H. Abrams Distinguished Visiting Professor
"The Family: Our Beloved Crisis"
Thursday, March 21, 4:30 p.m.
Lewis Auditorium, G76 Goldwin Smith Hall

Hortense Spillers is a Gertrude Conaway Vanderbilt Chair in English at Vanderbilt University; she lectures widely both at home and abroad, most recently at the University of British Columbia where she spent the fall semester of the current academic year as an international visiting fellow at the Peter Wall Institute of Advanced Study and the Institute of Race, Gender, Sexuality, and Social Justice; Hortense Spillers is the recipient of a number of prizes and awards, most recently the Jay Hubbell lifetime achievement award for contributions to the study of American Literature, an honor conferred by the American Literature Association and an Alumni achievement award from Brandeis University where she received the doctorate in 1974; her essays have been collected in Black, White, and in Color: Essays on American Literature and Culture;  Chicago, 2003. Currently at work on two large projects—the idea of Black culture and the status of women in the eighteenth century context of revolution and enslavement, she is addressing us today on a single aspect of the topic, the career of the family.

The M.H. Abrams Visiting Professorship was established in 2006 by Stephen H. Weiss ('57) in honor of Meyer H. “Mike" Abrams, late Class of 1916 Professor, Emeritus. Hortense Spillers is the Spring 2019 M.H. Abrams Distinguished Visiting Professor.

This lecture is the second spring semester installment in a year-long series of talks focusing on current topics in African American literary studies: the 2018-19 African American Studies Speaker Series. The talks in the series are supported by the Department of English and College of Arts and Sciences.

Free and open to the public

Reception to follow in the English Lounge, 258 Goldwin Smith Hall



English Department Roundtable: TBD
March 22, 2:30 p.m.
English Lounge, 258 Goldwin Smith Hall
Moderator: TBD

Copies of the paper are available in the English Department Roundtable (EDR) mailbox in the English Department mailroom (GS 250, on the far right of the wall of English grad student boxes) and on the EDR Blackboard site

Refreshments will be served

The English Department Roundtable is a forum for graduate students in the English Department to share ideas across a wide variety of fields, time periods, and methodologies.  Open to students at all stages of the program, the EDR gives us an opportunity to discuss our work in an informal setting with a group of our peers, to give and receive feedback about current projects, and to learn about the work being done by our colleagues. At a time in which the tremendous diversity of literary study has made it increasingly difficult to grasp the discipline as a whole, the purpose of the EDR is to foster a greater sense of intellectual community and cohesion within Cornell’s English Department, and to strengthen our work through increased collaboration with our peers.

Sponsored by the Class of 1916 Chair



English Department Roundtable: "'Deliver us from misreadings': Lupine Scholarship and the Making of Virginia Woolf"
Presenter: Alec Pollak
April 12, 12:30 p.m.
English Lounge, 258 Goldwin Smith Hall
Moderator: Sam Lagasse

Copies of the paper are available in the English Department Roundtable (EDR) mailbox in the English Department mailroom (GS 250, on the far right of the wall of English grad student boxes) and on the EDR Blackboard site

Refreshments will be served

The English Department Roundtable is a forum for graduate students in the English Department to share ideas across a wide variety of fields, time periods, and methodologies.  Open to students at all stages of the program, the EDR gives us an opportunity to discuss our work in an informal setting with a group of our peers, to give and receive feedback about current projects, and to learn about the work being done by our colleagues. At a time in which the tremendous diversity of literary study has made it increasingly difficult to grasp the discipline as a whole, the purpose of the EDR is to foster a greater sense of intellectual community and cohesion within Cornell’s English Department, and to strengthen our work through increased collaboration with our peers.

Sponsored by the Class of 1916 Chair



The Robert Chasen Memorial Poetry Reading by Claudia Rankine, Poet & Writer
Thursday, April 18, 5:00 p.m.
Alice Statler Auditorium, Statler Hall

The Spring 2019 Barbara & David Zalaznick Creative Writing Reading Series comes to a close with a reading by poet & writer Claudia Rankine. 

Recipient of the 2016 MacArthur Fellowship, Claudia Rankine is the author of five collections of poetry. Rankine is the recipient of the Poets & Writers’ Jackson Poetry Prize and fellowships from the Lannan Foundation and the National Endowment of the Arts. Rankine’s bestselling book, Citizen: An American Lyric, was the winner of the 2015 Forward Prize for Best Collection, the National Book Critics Circle Award for Poetry (it was also a finalist in the criticism category, making it the first book in the award’s history to be a double nominee), the NAACP Image Award, the PEN Open Book Award, and the LA Times Book Award for poetry. Citizen also holds the distinction of being the only poetry book to be a New York Times bestseller in the nonfiction category. She teaches at Yale University as the Frederick Iseman Professor of Poetry.

The Robert Chasen Memorial Poetry Reading is a biennial event, featuring a public reading by a distinguished poet. It was established in 1980 by Margaret Rosenzweig, '32, in memory of Robert Chasen.

Free admission - Ticket required. Tickets to this event are available at the Willard Straight Resource Center (4th/Main floor) from Friday, March 1 and while supplies last.

Statler Auditorium doors will open at 4:30 p.m. for seating at the reading on April 18.

Books signed by Claudia Rankine will be available for purchase at the reading on April 18.



Shop Talk featuring Robert Casper, Library of Congress
Thursday, April 25, 4:30 p.m.
English Lounge, 258 Goldwin Smith Hall

Robert Casper is the head of the Poetry and Literature Center at the Library of Congress. Casper will talk about his own post-MFA degree experience and the career trajectory that built on that degree to reach his prestigious position, followed by a Q&A. This informal conversation may assist students in making their own career goals.

The founding publisher of the literary magazine jubilat, Robert Casper has worked for the Council of Literary Magazines and Presses (where he served on the board) and the Poetry Society of America. He also served as the poetry chair of the Brooklyn Borough President’s Literary Council; as a member of the Poetry Coalition, LitNet, and the National Writer’s Museum National Advisory Council; and as a judge/panelist for the National Endowment for the Art’s “Poetry Out Loud” competition and “Great American Read” initiative, the PBS “Great American Read” Advisory Panel, the National Student Poets Program, and the National Youth Poet Laureate initiative, among others. He lives in Brooklyn with his wife, the poet Matthea Harvey.

Free and open to the public

Refreshments will be served



English Department Roundtable: TBD
April 26, 2:30 p.m.
English Lounge, 258 Goldwin Smith Hall
Moderator: TBD

Copies of the paper are available in the English Department Roundtable (EDR) mailbox in the English Department mailroom (GS 250, on the far right of the wall of English grad student boxes) and on the EDR Blackboard site

Refreshments will be served

The English Department Roundtable is a forum for graduate students in the English Department to share ideas across a wide variety of fields, time periods, and methodologies.  Open to students at all stages of the program, the EDR gives us an opportunity to discuss our work in an informal setting with a group of our peers, to give and receive feedback about current projects, and to learn about the work being done by our colleagues. At a time in which the tremendous diversity of literary study has made it increasingly difficult to grasp the discipline as a whole, the purpose of the EDR is to foster a greater sense of intellectual community and cohesion within Cornell’s English Department, and to strengthen our work through increased collaboration with our peers.

Sponsored by the Class of 1916 Chair



In A Word featuring Professor Carole Boyce Davies with Professor Ishion Hutchinson
"Caribbean Migrations and Imperial Projects"
Wednesday, May 1, 4:30 p.m.
Rhodes-Rawlings Auditorium, G70 Klarman Hall

Professors Boyce Davies and Hutchinson engage in a wide-ranging conversation about their creative and scholarly work archiving the Caribbean experience during global conflicts.

Ishion Hutchinson was born in Port Antonio, Jamaica. He is the author of two poetry collections: Far District and House of Lords and Commons. He is the recipient of the Windham-Campbell Prize, the National Book Critics Circle Award for Poetry, a Guggenheim Fellowship, Joseph Brodsky Rome Prize, the Whiting Writers Award, the PEN/Joyce Osterweil Award, and the American Academy of Arts and Letters Award in Literature, among others. He is a contributing editor to the literary journals The Common and Tongue: A Journal of Writing & Art. 

Carole Boyce Davies is a professor of English and Africana Studies at Cornell University. She has held distinguished professorships at a number of institutions, including the Herskovits Professor of African Studies and Professor of Comparative Literary Studies and African American Studies at Northwestern University. She is the author of Black Women, Writing and Identity: Migrations of the Subject and Left of Karl Marx: The Political Life of Black Communist Claudia Jones. Her most recent monograph is Caribbean Spaces: Escape Routes from Twilight Zones and a children’s book, Walking.

In A Word is a series that showcases the Creative Writing Program’s influences and contributions to the literary world by its dedicated faculty of poets and fiction writers.

Free and open to the public

Reception to follow in the English Lounge, 258 Goldwin Smith Hall



Creative Writing MFA Graduation Reading featuring
Saturday, May 11, 3:00 p.m.
Rhodes-Rawlings Auditorium, G70 Klarman Hall

The Department of English Program in Creative Writing proudly presents the MFA Graduation Reading! Fiction writers Remy Barnes, Nneoma Ike-Njoku, Alice Mercier and Charlotte Pattison, and poets Christopher Hewitt, Frances Revel, Sasha Smith and Alice Turski will share work from their theses or other works-in-progress.

Free and open to the public

Reception to follow in the English Lounge, 258 Goldwin Smith Hall



The Department of English Diploma Ceremony & Reception
May 24, 2019
3:00 p.m. Reception
4:00 p.m. Ceremony
Statler Auditorium

Light refreshments will be served

Photography by Grad Images



Fall 2018 Schedule

For a calendar view, please visit the University's English Events Calendar.
To add English events to your online calendar, see the "Subscribe To These Results” field of the University's English Events Calendar (bottom right of page) and select your calendar type. Also see Exporting Events (Google, Outlook Calendar Notes).
The Department of English is pleased to have purchased carbon offsets for our event guests' travel through the Finger Lakes Climate Fund, a program of Sustainable Tompkins.



Honoring Carol Edelman Warrior
August 30, 4:30-6:00 p.m.
Africana Studies & Research Center, 310 Triphammer Road

Please join the American Indian and Indigenous Studies Program and the Department of English in the Africana Center Multi-Purpose Room to recognize and remember Carol Edelman Warrior’s important contributions to Cornell University life and learning. As a cherished teacher, student mentor, and valued colleague, Carol gave generously of her time, insights and compassion to all. Please bring your good thoughts and memories to share. There will be both scheduled speakers--family, colleagues and students--and space for others who wish to contribute.

Light refreshments available



Jane Gallop talk
"Sexuality, Disability, and Aging: Queer Temporalities of the Phallus”
September 17, 4:30 p.m.
English Lounge, 258 Goldwin Smith Hall

Jane Gallop (Cornell PhD ’76 & BA ’72) is Distinguished Professor of English at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and the author of numerous books, including The Deaths of the Author: Reading and Writing in Time; Living with His Camera; and Feminist Accused of Sexual Harassment. Her new book, Sexuality, Disability, and Aging: Queer Temporalities of the Phallus, will appear from Duke next year.

Free and open to the public



Seminar with Erica Edwards (Rutgers University)
“Literature, Race, and Terror”
September 21, noon-2:00 p.m.
English Lounge, 258 Goldwin Smith Hall

This seminar will explore Edwards' essay on African American literature and the war on terror, a few selections from Evie Shockley’s recent volume of poetry, semiautomatic, and also: “A Most American Terrorist: The Making of Dylann Roof,” by Rachel Kaadzi Ghansah. 

RSVP to lbl3@cornell.edu to sign up for the seminar and receive the readings

This seminar will be followed by The Wendy Rosenthal Gellman Lecture on Modern Literature by Erica Edwards at 4:30 p.m. in the English Lounge



The Wendy Rosenthal Gellman Lecture on Modern Literature by Erica Edwards (Rutgers University)
'How Very American': Black Women Writers and the Long War on Terror
September 21, 4:30 p.m.
English Lounge, 258 Goldwin Smith Hall

This talk is drawn from Edwards' current book project, The Other Side of Terror: Black Women and the Grammars of State Violence, which analyzes how contemporary black expressive culture has refracted the culture of U.S. empire throughout the long war on terror, from 1968 to the present. Mapping the transformations of African American literature against global and local campaigns of counterinsurgency, this book argues that Black feminist poetry, fiction, television, and film have exposed the imperial grammars of blackness while also marking out minor grammars of subsistence, survival, and black radical undoing. 

Erica Edwards is Presidential Term Chair in African American Literature and Associate Professor of English at Rutgers University. She specializes in African American literature, gender and sexuality, and black political culture. Edwards is the author of Charisma and the Fictions of Black Leadership (University of Minnesota Press, 2012), which won the Modern Language Association’s 12th annual William Sanders Scarborough prize. Her work, published in such journals as American Quarterly, Callaloo, American Literary History, and Black Camera, shows how contemporary African American literature challenges us to think in new ways about the relationships between African American narrative, American popular culture, and the contemporary history of black politics and black social movements.

The Gellman Lecture, featuring a distinguished scholar of modern literature, was established by a generous gift from Wendy Rosenthal Gellman ‘81, who majored in English at Cornell.

This year, the Gellman Lecture launches a year-long series of talks focusing on current topics in African American literary studies: the 2018-19 African American Studies Speaker Series. The other talks in the series are supported by the Department of English and College of Arts and Sciences. Next in the series, a Lecture by GerShun Avilez on October 16.

Free and open to the public

Refreshments to follow in the Pale Fire Lounge



Reading by Gregory Pardlo
September 27, 4:30 p.m.
Rhodes-Rawlings Auditorium, G70 Klarman Hall

Pulitzer Prize-winning author Gregory Pardlo will deliver the first reading of the Fall 2018 Barbara & David Zalaznick Creative Writing Reading Series. Gregory Pardlo's ​collection​ Digest won the 2015 Pulitzer Prize for Poetry. His other honors​ include fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, the National Endowment for the Arts, and the New York Foundation for the Arts. Pardlo's first collection, Totem, was selected by Brenda Hillman for the APR/Honickman Prize in 2007. He is Poetry Editor of Virginia Quarterly Review. Air Traffic, a memoir in essays, was released by Knopf in April.

Free and open to the public

Reception and book signing to follow in the English Lounge, 258 Goldwin Smith Hall



Books Sandwiched In
Topic: Why Literature Matters

October 10, 12:15-1:10 p.m.
English Lounge, 258 Goldwin Smith Hall

Professor Chynthia Chase will lead discussion on the topic: "Wordsworth's Daffodils and Margaret Thatcher"

Books Sandwiched In is a monthly lunch series for Cornell undergraduates, designed to bring faculty and undergraduate students together in an informal and cozy setting to discuss literature. You need not be an English Major to attend. Join in this informal discussion with faculty, meet other students interested in literature, and get free lunch, too!



The Eamon McEneaney Memorial Reading by Alice McDermott
October 11, 4:30 p.m.
Rhodes-Rawlings Auditorium, G70 Klarman Hall

Novelist Alice McDermott will read from her work as part of the Barbara & David Zalaznick Creative Writing Reading Series. Alice McDermott’s eighth novel, The Ninth Hour, was a finalist for the 2017 National Book Critics Circle Award and the 2017 Kirkus Prize for Fiction. Her seventh novel, Someone, was a finalist for the Dublin IMPAC Award, the National Book Critics Circle Award, the Patterson Prize for Fiction, and the Dayton Literary Peace Prize. Three of her previous novels—After This, At Weddings and Wakes, and That Night—were finalists for the Pulitzer Prize. Charming Billy won the National Book Award for fiction in 1998. She is the Richard A. Macksey Professor of the Humanities at Johns Hopkins University. 

This reading is made possible by Eamon McEneaney’s Cornell teammates, family, and friends. In addition to being one of Cornell’s most talented and best-loved athletes, Eamon McEneaney ’77 was a dedicated husband and father, loyal friend, prolific writer and poet, and an American hero. He died on September 11, 2001, in the North Tower of the World Trade Center.

Free and open to the public

Reception and book signing to follow in the English Lounge, 258 Goldwin Smith Hall



English Department Roundtable: Gary Slack
"The Crisis of Craft: Ralph Ellison as Negro Authority"
October 12, 2:30 p.m.
English Lounge, 258 Goldwin Smith Hall
Moderator: Marty Cain

Copies of the paper are available in the EDR mailbox in the English Department mailroom (GS 250, on the far right of the wall of English grad student boxes) and on the EDR Blackboard site

Refreshments will be served

The English Department Roundtable is a forum for graduate students in the English Department to share ideas across a wide variety of fields, time periods, and methodologies.  Open to students at all stages of the program, the EDR gives us an opportunity to discuss our work in an informal setting with a group of our peers, to give and receive feedback about current projects, and to learn about the work being done by our colleagues. At a time in which the tremendous diversity of literary study has made it increasingly difficult to grasp the discipline as a whole, the purpose of the EDR is to foster a greater sense of intellectual community and cohesion within Cornell’s English Department, and to strengthen our work through increased collaboration with our peers.

Sponsored by the Class of 1916 Chair



Seminar with GerShun Avilez (University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill)
"Race, Sex, & Space"
October 16, noon-2:00 p.m.
English Lounge, 258 Goldwin Smith Hall

This seminar explores how questions of space (geographic and conceptual) are key elements in contemporary African American critical culture. In the process, we consider how spatial vocabularies provide valuable ways to think about the social construction of racial and sexual identity. 

RSVP to lbl3@cornell.edu to sign up for the seminar and receive the readings

This seminar will be followed by a Lecture by GerShun Avilez at 4:30 p.m. in the English Lounge



Lecture by GerShun Avilez (University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill)
“Fugitive Movement: Queer Vulnerability in the Black Diasporic Imaginary”
October 16, 4:30 p.m.
English Lounge, 258 Goldwin Smith Hall

In this talk, Avilez considers how social and geographic restrictions often constrain racial and sexual minorities and create conditions of vulnerability. However, to what extent is vulnerability the dominant lens for articulating Black queer life? Avilez takes up this question by first exploring the contexts for queer vulnerability and then highlighting innovative methods for documenting queer life and desire. Using fiction and ethnographic works, he demonstrates how Black queer subjects creatively navigate assumed states of vulnerability to express agency within the context of restriction. 

GerShun Avilez is an Associate Professor in the Department of English & Comparative Literature and the Director of the Program in Sexuality Studies at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. He is a cultural studies scholar who specializes in African American literature and visual culture, as well as the art of the Black Diaspora. He is the author of the book Radical Aesthetics and Modern Black Nationalism (Illinois), which won the 2017 William Sanders Scarborough Prize, given by the Modern Language Association for an outstanding scholarly study of African American literature or culture. Currently, he is completing a new book on spatial concerns in Black literary culture and social history and co-editing a special issue of the journal Women's Studies. 

This talk is the second in the 2018-19 African American Studies Speaker Series, sponsored by the Department of English and College of Arts and Sciences.

Free and open to the public

Refreshments to follow in the Pale Fire Lounge



Political Resentment: a discussion with Pierre Fasula (Université Paris 1 - Panthéon-Sorbonne, Philosophy, Research fellow)
October 22, 5-6:30 p.m.
English Lounge, 258 Goldwin Smith Hall

Join us for this discussion across people in philosophy, political science, cultural studies, and literature about the problem of political resentment.

Pierre Fasula defended a PhD at the Sorbonne, about “The Sense of Possibility in Musil and Wittgenstein’s Works" (2013). He works mainly in ethics, and social and political philosophy, as well as in philosophy of language and literature.

Email cel235@cornell.edu to receive the readings



"Translation Matters": a conversation with Valzhyna Mort, Edmundo Paz-Soldán, & Fernando Toda
October 23, 4:30 p.m.
English Lounge, 258 Goldwin Smith Hall

Three admired scholars and translators will converse about their translation work and translation in general:

"When we try to formulate what it means to translate poetry, we come closest to defining poetry itself. A translation of a poem is simultaneously a poem and a text about understanding it – a poem about a poem." Valzhyna Mort is Professor of the Practice in the Department of English at Cornell, the author of two books of poetry, and a translator between English and several Slavic languages. She will discuss a text as a migrant and translating speechlessness.

Edmundo Paz-Soldán teaches Latin American Literature in the Romance Studies Department at Cornell. He has written eleven novels and has been translated to eleven languages. His last novel in translation is Norte (U Chicago P). He will talk about the challenges of translating the novel Bodega Dreams, by Ernesto Quiñonez, into Spanish, focusing on the different registers of Spanish needed to make it work.

Fernando Toda is Professor of Translation at the University of Salamanca and previously taught History of the English Language at the University of Seville, in Spain. He has translated some twenty books, mostly prose and some poetry. He will be addressing key issues in professional literary translation, with special reference to his rendering of particularly challenging parts of the novel Mailman, by J. Robert Lennon, into Castilian Spanish.

Free and open to the public

Light refreshments provided



Reading by Viet Thanh Nguyen
October 25, 4:30 p.m.
Hollis E. Cornell Auditorium, 132 Goldwin Smith Hall

Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist & cultural critic Viet Thanh Nguyen will read from his work as part of the Barbara & David Zalaznick Creative Writing Reading Series. Viet Thanh Nguyen’s novel The Sympathizer is a New York Times best seller and won the 2016 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. His current book is the bestselling short story collection, The Refugees. Most recently he has been the recipient of fellowships from the Guggenheim and MacArthur Foundations. He is a University Professor, the Aerol Arnold Chair of English, and a Professor of English, American Studies and Ethnicity, and Comparative Literature at the University of Southern California. He is a critic-at-large for the Los Angeles Times and a contributing opinion writer for the New York Times.

Free and open to the public

Reception and book signing to follow in the English Lounge, 258 Goldwin Smith Hall



"For the Love of Literature": a talk about alternative publishing by Lamar Herrin and Gail Holst-Warhaft
November 6, 5:00 p.m.
English Lounge, 258 Goldwin Smith Hall

Ithaca/Cornell writers Lamar Herrin and Gail Holst-Warhaft have both published books with Fomite Press and will talk about the experience of working with a press that may not be well known but compensates with a willingness to consider unusual manuscripts and produce beautiful books. Writers who despair of finding a publisher for a manuscript would do well to consider Fomite and a growing number of small presses willing to take a risk on lesser-known authors or unusual books.

Fomite Press is one of a number of small, idealist presses that are not concerned with making a profit but publish manuscripts for the pleasure of producing interesting, off-beat, or simply good books. Unlike many publishers, they like to publish bi-lingual books and insist on bi-lingual texts for translations. Marc Estrin and Donna Bister’s press is based in Burlington, VT. Estrin, the principal editor, is a prolific novelist himself, and Bister, who survives on a day job, designs and helps edit the books. Originally, Fomite solicited manuscripts from writers they knew or admired, but as they became better known, they were flooded with manuscripts from everywhere. They now publish approximately 20 books a year. Their stated market is "People who value literature and who are interested in reading things that push beyond commercial genres. We even have a category called 'Odd Birds: Eluding the Net of Classification.'” It is Fomite's policy to involve the author in every stage of the book's production - design, typescript, cover art, promotion, etc. - so that the the author is given an education in what it takes to bring a book out into the world.

Free and open to the public

Light refreshments available



The Philip Freund Prize for Creative Writing Alumni Reading by Catherine Chung, Ezra Dan Feldman, Sara Eliza Johnson, & Sarah Scoles
November 8, 4:30 p.m.
Rhodes-Rawlings Auditorium, G70 Klarman Hall

Recipients of the 2018 Philip Freund Prize for Creative Writing for excellence in publication will read from their works:

Catherine Chung MFA ’06 Writer
Ezra Dan Feldman MFA ’08, PhD ’17 Poet
Sara Eliza Johnson BA ’06 Poet
Sarah Scoles MFA ’10 Nonfiction Writer

Catherine Chung was born in Evanston, IL and studied mathematics at the University of Chicago before receiving her MFA from Cornell. She is the author of Forgotten Country, and the recipient of a National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship, an Honorable Mention for the PEN/Hemingway Award, a Granta New Voice, and a fiction editor at Guernica Magazine. Her new novel, The Tenth Muse, is forthcoming from Ecco in 2019.

Ezra Dan Feldman is the author of Habitat of Stones, which won the Patricia Bibby First Book Award. He has published in RHINO, Crazyhorse, DIAGRAM, The Los Angeles Review, Gertrude, and other journals. He teaches English and Science and Technology Studies at Williams College.

Sara Eliza Johnson’s first book, Bone Map, won the 2013 National Poetry Series. She is a recipient of an NEA Fellowship in poetry, a Rona Jaffe Writers’ Award, and two fellowships from the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown, among other honors. Her work has appeared or is forthcoming in Virginia Quarterly Review, Boston Review, Crazyhorse, Blackbird, and elsewhere.

Sarah Scoles is the author of the book Making Contact: Jill Tarter and the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence. She is a contributing reporter at WIRED and a contributing editor at Popular Science, and her nonfiction work has also appeared in The Atlantic, The Washington Post, Slate, Scientific American, and others. Her fiction has been published in the Alaska Quarterly Review, Catapult, LIT, and other journals.

Philip Freund ’29, MA ’32, was a novelist, short-story writer, poet, documentary film writer, playwright, television dramatist, essayist, and literary critic. The Philip Freund Prize for Creative Writing honors graduates upon their successful publication. 

Free and open to the public

Reception and book signing to follow in the English Lounge, 258 Goldwin Smith Hall



English Department Roundtable: Jen Rabedeau
"Poems by Walt Whitman & the Packaging of an American Poet for a British Audience"
November 9, 2:30 p.m.
English Lounge, 258 Goldwin Smith Hall
Moderator: Bojan Srbinovski

Copies of the paper are available in the EDR mailbox in the English Department mailroom (GS 250, on the far right of the wall of English grad student boxes) and on the EDR Blackboard site

Refreshments will be served

The English Department Roundtable is a forum for graduate students in the English Department to share ideas across a wide variety of fields, time periods, and methodologies.  Open to students at all stages of the program, the EDR gives us an opportunity to discuss our work in an informal setting with a group of our peers, to give and receive feedback about current projects, and to learn about the work being done by our colleagues. At a time in which the tremendous diversity of literary study has made it increasingly difficult to grasp the discipline as a whole, the purpose of the EDR is to foster a greater sense of intellectual community and cohesion within Cornell’s English Department, and to strengthen our work through increased collaboration with our peers.

Sponsored by the Class of 1916 Chair



Coffee Break with the Profs

November 14, 12:15-1:10 p.m.
English Lounge, 258 Goldwin Smith Hall

Books Sandwiched In is a monthly lunch series for Cornell undergraduates, designed to bring faculty and undergraduate students together in an informal and cozy setting to discuss literature. You need not be an English Major to attend. Join in this informal discussion with faculty, meet other students interested in literature, and get free lunch, too!

Email Corrine at cb624@cornell.edu to reserve your seat, and please include your netID in your reply.



English Department Roundtable: speaker TBA
Title TBA
November 30, 2:30 p.m.
English Lounge, 258 Goldwin Smith Hall
Moderator:

Copies of the paper are available in the EDR mailbox in the English Department mailroom (GS 250, on the far right of the wall of English grad student boxes) and on the EDR Blackboard site

Refreshments will be served

The English Department Roundtable is a forum for graduate students in the English Department to share ideas across a wide variety of fields, time periods, and methodologies.  Open to students at all stages of the program, the EDR gives us an opportunity to discuss our work in an informal setting with a group of our peers, to give and receive feedback about current projects, and to learn about the work being done by our colleagues. At a time in which the tremendous diversity of literary study has made it increasingly difficult to grasp the discipline as a whole, the purpose of the EDR is to foster a greater sense of intellectual community and cohesion within Cornell’s English Department, and to strengthen our work through increased collaboration with our peers.

Sponsored by the Class of 1916 Chair



Spring 2018 Schedule

For a calendar view, please visit the University's English Events Calendar.
To add English events to your online calendar, see the "Subscribe To These Results” field of the University's English Events Calendar (bottom right of page) and select your calendar type.



Reading by Julie Sheehan
February 1, 4:30 p.m.
Hollis E. Cornell Auditorium, 132 Goldwin Smith Hall

The Barbara & David Zalaznick Creative Writing Reading Series kicks off with a reading by poet Julie Sheehan, Distinguished Visiting Writer of the Cornell University Department of English for the Spring 2018 Semester.

Reception and book signing to follow in the English Lounge, 258 Goldwin Smith Hall



The Richard Cleaveland Memorial Reading featuring J. Robert Lennon & Lyrae Van Clief-Stefanon

February 8, 4:30 p.m.
Rhodes-Rawlings Auditorium, G70 Klarman Hall

The Spring 2018 Barbara & David Zalaznick Creative Writing Reading Series continues with the Richard Cleaveland Memorial Reading featuring J. Robert Lennon, fiction writer, and Lyrae Van Clief-Stefanon, poet.

The Richard Cleaveland Memorial Reading was created in 2002 by family and friends of Richard Cleaveland, Cornell Class of ’74, to honor his memory

Reception and book signing to follow in the English Lounge, 258 Goldwin Smith Hall



English Department Roundtable: Becky Lu
Title: "'I thy soverayne prayses loud will sing': Tracing Elizabeth I from The Shepheardes Calender to Epithalamion"
February 9, 2:30 p.m.
236 Goldwin Smith Hall
Moderator: Laura Francis

Copies of the paper are available in the EDR mailbox in the English Department mailroom (GS 250, on the far right of the wall of English grad student boxes) and on the EDR Blackboard site

Refreshments will be served

The English Department Roundtable is a forum for graduate students in the English Department to share ideas across a wide variety of fields, time periods, and methodologies.  Open to students at all stages of the program, the EDR gives us an opportunity to discuss our work in an informal setting with a group of our peers, to give and receive feedback about current projects, and to learn about the work being done by our colleagues. At a time in which the tremendous diversity of literary study has made it increasingly difficult to grasp the discipline as a whole, the purpose of the EDR is to foster a greater sense of intellectual community and cohesion within Cornell’s English Department, and to strengthen our work through increased collaboration with our peers.

Sponsored by the Class of 1916 Chair



Books Sandwiched In
Topic: "Career Advice for English Majors - Employers Want YOU!"

Feburary 14, 12:15-1:10 p.m.
English Lounge, 258 Goldwin Smith Hall

The Career Development Office will present and discuss opportunities for English majors and jobs. This program will be the first of several op­portunities over the next few years to hear about various career paths of English alumni and to learn about the resources available to you at the Career Development Center.

Books Sandwiched In is a monthly lunch series for Cornell undergraduates. You need not be an English Major to attend. Join in this informal discussion, meet other students interested in literature, and get free lunch, too!

Email Corrine at cb624@cornell.edu to reserve your seat, and please include your netID in your reply.



English Department Roundtable: Nici Bragg
Title: "'Beside Myself': The Maternal Poetics of Judith Butler"
Februrary 23, 2:30 p.m.
English Lounge, 258 Goldwin Smith Hall
Moderator: Jane Glaubman

Copies of the paper are available in the EDR mailbox in the English Department mailroom (GS 250, on the far right of the wall of English grad student boxes) and on the EDR Blackboard site

Refreshments will be served

The English Department Roundtable is a forum for graduate students in the English Department to share ideas across a wide variety of fields, time periods, and methodologies.  Open to students at all stages of the program, the EDR gives us an opportunity to discuss our work in an informal setting with a group of our peers, to give and receive feedback about current projects, and to learn about the work being done by our colleagues. At a time in which the tremendous diversity of literary study has made it increasingly difficult to grasp the discipline as a whole, the purpose of the EDR is to foster a greater sense of intellectual community and cohesion within Cornell’s English Department, and to strengthen our work through increased collaboration with our peers.

Sponsored by the Class of 1916 Chair



Books Sandwiched In - Literature in Today's World
Topic: Lyric Poetry
Featuring faculty guests: a scholar of poetry (Prof. Roger Gilbert), a poet (Prof. Joanie Mackowski), and the poetry columnist for the New York Times Book Review (Prof. David Orr)

March 7, 12:15-1:10 p.m.
English Lounge, 258 Goldwin Smith Hall

Books Sandwiched In is a monthly lunch series for Cornell undergraduates. You need not be an English Major to attend. Join in this informal discussion, meet other students interested in literature, and get free lunch, too!

Email Corrine at cb624@cornell.edu to reserve your seat, and please include your netID in your reply.



English Department Roundtable: Austin Lillywhite
Title: “Is Posthumanism Primitivism?”
March 9, 2:30 p.m.
English Lounge, 258 Goldwin Smith Hall
Moderator: Malcolm Bare

Copies of the paper are available in the EDR mailbox in the English Department mailroom (GS 250, on the far right of the wall of English grad student boxes) and on the EDR Blackboard site

Refreshments will be served

The English Department Roundtable is a forum for graduate students in the English Department to share ideas across a wide variety of fields, time periods, and methodologies.  Open to students at all stages of the program, the EDR gives us an opportunity to discuss our work in an informal setting with a group of our peers, to give and receive feedback about current projects, and to learn about the work being done by our colleagues. At a time in which the tremendous diversity of literary study has made it increasingly difficult to grasp the discipline as a whole, the purpose of the EDR is to foster a greater sense of intellectual community and cohesion within Cornell’s English Department, and to strengthen our work through increased collaboration with our peers.

Sponsored by the Class of 1916 Chair



Reading by Julie Schumacher
March 15, 4:30 p.m.
Rhodes-Rawlings Auditorium, G70 Klarman Hall

Writer Julie Schumacher will read from her work as part of the Spring 2018 Barbara & David Zalaznick Creative Writing Reading Series.

Reception and book signing to follow in the English Lounge, 258 Goldwin Smith Hall



Celebrating Dan Schwarz: 50 Years of Transformative Teaching

March 23, 2:30-6:00 p.m.
Rhodes-Rawlings Auditorium, G70 Klarman Hall

March 24, 9:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m.
Rhodes-Rawlings Auditorium, G70 Klarman Hall

The Department of English is planning a major celebration to honor Dan Schwarz’s 50th year of teaching at Cornell. The event will include panels, lectures, toasts, and other tributes to one of Cornell’s most beloved professors.

Conference Schedule
The conference begins Friday afternoon and continues for a full day Saturday

Friday, March 23
Rhodes-Rawlings Audiorium, G70 Klarman Hall

2:30-2:45 p.m.
Introductory Remarks
Gretchen Ritter
, Harold Tanner Dean of Arts & Sciences (Cornell)

2:45-3:45 p.m.
The Humanities as Gateway: Vocations and Avocations

Panel discussion with Cornell alumni:
Úlfar Erlingsson (Google Brain) PhD, Computer Science, ‘04
Ashley Featherstone (Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center) BA, English, ‘08
Devon Goodrich (New York City Law Department) BA, English, ‘07
Diana Lind (Fels Policy Research Initiative, UPenn) BA, English, ‘03
Morgan Sze (Azentus Capital Management) BA, English, Economics, ‘87
Moderated by Barbara A. Baird, Horace White Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Biology (Cornell) PhD, Chemistry, '79

4:00-5:00 p.m.
"Dan Schwarz, Humanistic Poetics, and the Ethics of Reading"
James Phelan (Ohio State University)
Introduction by Harry E. Shaw, Professor of English (Cornell)
Phelan invites guests to read a short story in advance of his lecture, Jhumpa Lahiri's "The Third and Final Continent"

5:15-6:00 p.m.
“My Life as Teacher and Scholar”
Dan Schwarz, Frederic J. Whiton Professor of English Literature and Stephen H. Weiss Presidential Fellow (Cornell)
Introduction by Kenneth A. McClane, W.E.B. Du Bois Professor of Literature Emeritus (Cornell)

6:00-8:00 p.m.
Dinner in Groos Family Atrium, Klarman Hall

Champagne toast and tributes to Dan Schwarz beginning at 7:00 p.m.

Saturday, March 24
Rhodes-Rawlings Audiorium, G70 Klarman Hall

9:30-10:30 a.m.
“Transforming Humanism: Pluralism in a (Post-)Secular Age”

Beth Newman (Southern Methodist University)
Introduction by Laura Brown, John Wendell Anderson Professor of English (Cornell)

10:45-11:45 a.m.
Five Decades of Transformative Teaching
Panel discussion with Cornell alumni:
Josh Gerber BA, English, College Scholar, ‘08
Grace Jean BA, English, ’00
Leslie Storm BA, English, ’83
Beverly Tanenhaus BA, English, ’70
Zach Zahos BA, English, PMA, College Scholar, ‘15
Moderated by Brett de Bary, Professor of Asian Studies and Comparative Literature (Cornell)

11:45 a.m.-1:30 p.m.
Lunch on own

1:30-2:30 p.m.
“Modernist Funnies, or, Comics in the Age of Mass High Culture”
Lee Konstantinou (University of Maryland)
Introduction by Kevin Attell, Associate Professor of English (Cornell)

2:45-3:45 p.m.
"Reconfiguring Word and Image"
Janice Carlisle (Yale University)
Introduction by Caroline Levine, David and Kathleen Ryan Professor of Humanities (Cornell)

4:00-5:30 p.m.
Transformations in Literary Studies
Roundtable with Dan Schwarz and friends:
Steven Knapp (The George Washington University)
Helen Maxson (Southwestern Oklahoma State University)
Daniel Morris (Purdue University)
Edward O’Shea (State University of New York, Oswego)
Moderated by George Hutchinson, Newton C. Farr Professor of American Culture (Cornell)

Co-sponsored by the Dean of the College of Arts & Sciences; the Society for the Humanities; the departments of Comparative Literature, German Studies, Performing and Media Arts, and Romance Studies; and the Jewish Studies Program

*Visit the Celebrating Dan Schwarz event webpage for ongoing updates and more information



Seminar by Lawrence Buell (Harvard University)
“What Is Environmental Memory, Anyhow?”
April 12, 12:30-2:00 p.m.
English Lounge, 258 Goldwin Smith Hall

This seminar will double as a reconnaissance of the full scope of the still-emergent master concept to be deployed more selectively in the afternoon lecture and as an opportunity to contribute through free-swinging dialogue and unsparing critique toward a more sophisticated formation. The optional reading, “Uses and Abuses of Environmental Memory,” aims to serve both purposes: as partial distillation of Dr. Buell's present thinking but also as a stage beyond which the project has since evolved. The seminar will not, however, presuppose more than cursory inspection of this text, nor will the afternoon lecture presuppose attendance at the seminar.

RSVP to lbl3@cornell.edu to sign up for the seminar

This seminar will be followed by The Wendy Rosenthal Gellman Lecture on Modern Literature by Lawrence Buell at 4:30 p.m. in Hollis E. Cornell Auditorium



The Wendy Rosenthal Gellman Lecture on Modern Literature by Lawrence Buell (Harvard University)
“Remembering the Future to Keep It from Happening: Environmental Imagination in the Anthropocene”
April 12, 4:30 p.m.
Hollis E. Cornell Auditorium, 132 Goldwin Smith Hall

The well-attested interdependences between the processes of memory and anticipation go a long way toward explaining both the power of environmental memory as a driver of bodies, minds, and peoples as well as its resistance to executive control. Nowhere are these complexities more revealingly on display than in works of creative imagination, which, so regarded, underscore the importance of the environmental humanities in confronting the challenges of the Anthropocene era.

The Gellman Lecture, featuring a distinguished scholar of modern literature, was established by a generous gift from Wendy Rosenthal Gellman ‘81, who majored in English at Cornell

Reception to follow in the English Lounge, 258 Goldwin Smith Hall

Lawrence Buell is Powell M. Cabot Professor of American Literature Emeritus at Harvard. He has written extensively and lectured worldwide on the environmental humanities. His books include The Environmental Imagination (1995), Writing for an Endangered World (2001), and The Future of Environmental Criticism (2005). In 2007 he received the Modern Language Association’s Jay Hubbell Award for lifetime contributions to American Literature scholarship. In 2008 he was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. His current book project is on “Environmental Memory in Art and Real Life.”

This lecture is also part of the 2017-18 Environmental Humanities Lecture Series organized by Anindita Banerjee of Comparative Literature and George Hutchinson of English and the Knight Institute. The series is sponsored by the Atkinson Center for a Sustainable Future, the College of Arts and Sciences, the Society for the Humanities, the Mario Einaudi Center for International Studies, the departments of English, Comparative Literature, and Science and Technology Studies, and the American Studies Program.



English Department Roundtable: Brianna Thompson
Title: “’just feeling my way’: World Building through Religion, Queer Intimacy, and Trauma in Octavia Butler’s Parable of the Talents”
April 13, 2:30 p.m.
English Lounge, 258 Goldwin Smith Hall
Moderator: Ju Hyun Lee

Copies of the paper are available in the EDR mailbox in the English Department mailroom (GS 250, on the far right of the wall of English grad student boxes) and on the EDR Blackboard site

Refreshments will be served

The English Department Roundtable is a forum for graduate students in the English Department to share ideas across a wide variety of fields, time periods, and methodologies.  Open to students at all stages of the program, the EDR gives us an opportunity to discuss our work in an informal setting with a group of our peers, to give and receive feedback about current projects, and to learn about the work being done by our colleagues. At a time in which the tremendous diversity of literary study has made it increasingly difficult to grasp the discipline as a whole, the purpose of the EDR is to foster a greater sense of intellectual community and cohesion within Cornell’s English Department, and to strengthen our work through increased collaboration with our peers.

Sponsored by the Class of 1916 Chair



TRANS*forming Literature: a reading & conversation with Ryka Aoki, Helen Boyd, & Ely Shipley
April 26, 4:30 p.m.
Hollis E. Cornell Auditorium, 132 Goldwin Smith Hall

The Spring 2018 Barbara & David Zalaznick Creative Writing Reading Series wraps up with a reading and conversation with:
Ryka Aoki Poet, Novelist, & Composer
Helen Boyd Writer & Educator
Ely Shipley Poet

Reception and book signing to follow in the English Lounge, 258 Goldwin Smith Hall



English Department Roundtable: Gabriella Friedman
Title: "The tunnel that no one had made': Colson Whitehead's Infrastructural Speculation"
April 27, 2:30 p.m.
English Lounge, 258 Goldwin Smith Hall
Moderator: Jesse Goldberg

Copies of the paper are available in the EDR mailbox in the English Department mailroom (GS 250, on the far right of the wall of English grad student boxes) and on the EDR Blackboard site

Refreshments will be served

The English Department Roundtable is a forum for graduate students in the English Department to share ideas across a wide variety of fields, time periods, and methodologies.  Open to students at all stages of the program, the EDR gives us an opportunity to discuss our work in an informal setting with a group of our peers, to give and receive feedback about current projects, and to learn about the work being done by our colleagues. At a time in which the tremendous diversity of literary study has made it increasingly difficult to grasp the discipline as a whole, the purpose of the EDR is to foster a greater sense of intellectual community and cohesion within Cornell’s English Department, and to strengthen our work through increased collaboration with our peers.

Sponsored by the Class of 1916 Chair



In A Word: featuring Joanie Mackowski and Elisha Cohn, In Conversation
May 2, 4:30 p.m.
Rhodes-Rawlings Auditorium, G70 Klarman Hall

How can we write beyond the human? Though lyric poems are often assumed to express the perspective of a single human voice, or novels to focus on the story of an individual protagonist, what resources might writers have to imagine alternative perspectives? How can we speak from the vantage of animals, vapors, cells, corporate or collective persons? In this conversation, Joanie Mackowski and Elisha Cohn (Associate Professors of English) bring together creative and critical perspectives on ecological, scientific, social, and above all, aesthetic efforts to rethink the boundaries between selves as connections among bodies.
In A Word is a new series that showcases the Creative Writing Program’s influences and contributions to the literary world by its dedicated faculty of poets and fiction writers.

Reception to follow in the English Lounge, 258 Goldwin Smith Hall



MFA Graduation Reading
May 12, 3:00 p.m.
Rhodes-Rawlings Auditorium, G70 Klarman Hall

The Department of English Program in Creative Writing proudly presents the MFA Graduation Reading! Poets Cristina Correa, Emily Mercurio, Carl Moon, & Lindsey Warren, and fiction writers Neal Giannone, Peter Gilbert, Shakarean Hutchinson, Weena Pun, & Hema Surendranathan will share work from their theses or other works-in-progress.

Reception to follow in the English Lounge, 258 Goldwin Smith Hall



The Department of English Diploma Ceremony & Reception

May 25, 2018
3:00 p.m. Reception
4:00 p.m. Ceremony
Statler Auditorium

Light refreshments will be served


Photography by Grad Images



Novel Studies Conference

May 31-June 2, 2018

The biennial conference of the Society for Novel Studies at Cornell University

Please visit the conference website for the full schedule, registration information, and more!



Fall 2017 Schedule

For a calendar view, please visit the University's English Events Calendar.
To add English events to your online calendar, see the "Subscribe To These Results” field of the University's English Events Calendar (bottom right of page) and select your calendar type.



Lecture by Priyamvada Gopal (University of Cambridge, U.K.)
"Insurgent Empire: How Anticolonial Resistance Shaped Dissent in Britain"
September 5th, 4:30pm
English Lounge, 258 Goldwin Smith Hall

Priyamvada Gopal (Ph.D., Cornell 2000) is a Reader in Anglophone and Related Literatures at the University of Cambridge and a Fellow of Churchill College. She is the author of Literary Radicalism in India (Routledge, 2005) and The Indian Novel in English: Nation, History and Narration (Oxford, 2009). She has written for The Guardian, The Nation, Al-Jazeera, Open: the Magazine and The Hindu, among others. Her forthcoming book, Insurgent Empire, is due out with Verso in 2018.

Refreshments provided



Reading by Ron Rash
September 7th, 4:30pm
Rhodes-Rawlings Auditorium, G70 Klarman Hall

The Fall 2017 Barbara & David Zalaznick Reading Series kicks off with a reading by poet & fiction writer Ron Rash.

Reception and book signing to follow in the English Lounge, 258 Goldwin Smith Hall



Reading by Quan Barry
September 14th, 4:30pm
Rhodes-Rawlings Auditorium, G70 Klarman Hall

Quan Barry, poet & novelist, reads from her work as part of the Fall 2017 Barbara & David Zalaznick Reading Series.

Reception and book signing to follow in the English Lounge, 258 Goldwin Smith Hall



English Department Roundtable: Presenter Mint Damrongpiwat
Title: "Birth and the Posthuman: Cats, Rabbits, and Frankenstein's Monster"
September 22, 2:30pm
English Lounge, 258 Goldwin Smith Hall
Moderator: Maddie Reynolds

Copies of the paper are available in the EDR mailbox in the English Department mailroom (GS 250, on the far right of the wall of English grad student boxes) and on the EDR Blackboard site.

Refreshments will be served.

The English Department Roundtable is a forum for graduate students in the English Department to share ideas across a wide variety of fields, time periods, and methodologies.  Open to students at all stages of the program, the EDR gives us an opportunity to discuss our work in an informal setting with a group of our peers, to give and receive feedback about current projects, and to learn about the work being done by our colleagues. At a time in which the tremendous diversity of literary study has made it increasingly difficult to grasp the discipline as a whole, the purpose of the EDR is to foster a greater sense of intellectual community and cohesion within Cornell’s English Department, and to strengthen our work through increased collaboration with our peers.

Sponsored by the Class of 1916 Chair.



The Robert Chasen Memorial Poetry Reading featuring Marilyn Hacker
September 28th, 4:30pm
Rhodes-Rawlings Auditorium, G70 Klarman Hall

Marilyn Hacker, poet & translator, reads from her work as part of the Fall 2017 Barbara & David Zalaznick Reading Series.

The Robert Chasen Memorial Poetry Reading is a biennial event, featuring a public reading by a distinguished poet. It was established in 1980 by Margaret Rosenzweig, 32, in memory of Robert Chasen.

Reception and book signing to follow in the English Lounge, 258 Goldwin Smith Hall



Books Sandwiched In - Literature in Today's World
Topic: Literature and Politics
Faculty guests: Prof. Kate McCullough, Prof. Helena Maria Viramontes, Prof. Shelley Wong

October 4, 12:15-1:10pm
English Lounge, 258 Goldwin Smith Hall

How can literature help us understand and interpret the complexities of contemporary life? What can literary art contribute to bigger cultural, political, social debates? How does literature comment on the issues of its own time, and how might it offer insight into today’s issues as well? Join us for a new year of Books Sandwiched In, a year focusing on the ongoing relevance of literature in our daily lives. Have a free lunch and an informal discussion with faculty, and meet other students interested in literature!

Books Sandwiched In is a monthly lunch series for Cornell undergraduates. You need not be an English Major to attend. Join in this informal discussion with faculty of literature's relevance to politics, meet other students interested in literature, and get free lunch, too!

Email Corrine at cb624@cornell.edu to reserve your seat, and please include your netID in your reply.



Reading by Marlon James
October 12th, 4:30pm
Rhodes-Rawlings Auditorium, G70 Klarman Hall

Marlon James, novelist, reads from his work as the final installment of the Fall 2017 Barbara & David Zalaznick Reading Series.

Reception and book signing to follow in the English Lounge, 258 Goldwin Smith Hall



English Department Roundtable: Presenter Jesse Goldberg
Title: "What lay beneath their names: Social Death, The Afterlife of Property, and Pilate's Insistence of Black Being in Song of Solomon"
October 13, 2:30pm
Room 283, Goldwin Smith Hall
Moderator: Marquis Bey

Copies of the paper are available in the EDR mailbox in the English Department mailroom (GS 250, on the far right of the wall of English grad student boxes) and on the EDR Blackboard site.

Refreshments will be served.

The English Department Roundtable is a forum for graduate students in the English Department to share ideas across a wide variety of fields, time periods, and methodologies.  Open to students at all stages of the program, the EDR gives us an opportunity to discuss our work in an informal setting with a group of our peers, to give and receive feedback about current projects, and to learn about the work being done by our colleagues. At a time in which the tremendous diversity of literary study has made it increasingly difficult to grasp the discipline as a whole, the purpose of the EDR is to foster a greater sense of intellectual community and cohesion within Cornell’s English Department, and to strengthen our work through increased collaboration with our peers.

Sponsored by the Class of 1916 Chair.



The Critical Race Series Lecture by Nelson Maldonado-Torres (Rutgers University)
“The World that Coloniality Built: Fanonian Meditations on Language and Love”
October 18th, 4:30pm
English Lounge, 258 Goldwin Smith Hall

The world that modernity/coloniality built is a world of Manichean hierarchies and forms of segregation and separation that serve those hierarchies. Language and love are fundamental forms of connection, which means that they find themselves in precarious conditions in the modern/colonial world. This presentation explores the meaning of language and love, as well as the idea of their respective decolonizations (e.g., decolonial language and decolonial love), with particular attention to Frantz Fanon’s classic text, Black Skin, White Masks.

Nelson Maldonado-Torres is Associate Professor in the Department of Latino and Caribbean Studies, member of the core faculty of the Comparative Literature Program, and faculty affiliate in the Doctoral Program in Women and Gender Studies at Rutgers University, New Brunswick. He has been President of the Caribbean Philosophical Association (2008-2013), Director of the Center for Latino Policy Research at the University of California, Berkeley (2009-2010), and Chair of the Department of Latino and Caribbean Studies at Rutgers (2012-2015). He is a board member of the Frantz Fanon Foundation in Paris, France, and honorary member of the Fausto Reinaga Foundation in La Paz, Bolivia. His publications include Against War: Views from the Underside of Modernity (Duke UP, 2008), and the collection of essays La descolonización y el giro decolonial (Decolonization and the decolonial turn), compiled by the Universidad de la Tierra (Chiapas, Mexico) in 2011. He has guest edited two issues on “mapping the decolonial turn” for the journal Transmodernity, and is currently working two book projects: Theorizing the Decolonial Turn and Fanonian Meditations.

Light refreshments provided

This event is cosponsored by Latina/o Studies


Reading by Steven McCall
October 23rd, 4:30pm
English Lounge, 258 Goldwin Smith Hall

Come join Steven McCall for a reading from Dan McCall’s posthumous memoir, Boy on a Unicycle: Confessions of a Young Man Trained to be a Winner.

Dan McCall (1940-2012) was a beloved professor of American Studies and English at Cornell for forty years. He was the critically acclaimed author of ten books of fiction and non-fiction, including Triphammer, The Example of Richard Wright, and Beecher. His novel Jack the Bear was translated into a dozen languages and made into a 20th Century Fox feature film.
Despite being passionate about his memoir, and producing dozens of drafts over the course of his lifetime, Dan was never able to settle on a final version. After his passing in 2012, his son Steven decided to take up the project and see it through to completion. Now, at long last, Boy on a Unicycle has just been published, in September 2017.
Boy on a Unicycle tells of a 1950s teen prodigy with a particular gift for enthralling audiences with speeches about American optimism. Steven will read excerpts from the book and talk about “the story behind the story”—of a novelist’s obsessive quest to examine the lies and truths of his youth, and a son’s determination to bring his father’s memoir into the world.  

Light refreshments provided


The Philip Freund Prize for Creative Writing Alumni Reading: Lauren K. Alleyne, Tacey M. Atsitty, Jennine Capó Crucet & Stephen Gutierrez
November 2, 4:30pm
Rhodes-Rawlings Auditorium, G70 Klarman Hall

Recipients of the 2017 Philip Freund Prize for Creative Writing for excellence in publication read from their works:
Lauren K. Alleyne ‘06 Poet
Tacey M. Atsitty ‘11 Poet
Jennine Capó Crucet ‘03 Fiction Writer
Stephen Gutierrez ‘87 Fiction & Nonfiction Writer

Reception and book signing to follow in the English Lounge, 258 Goldwin Smith Hall



Books Sandwiched In - Literature in Today's World
Topic: Literary and Visual Representation
Faculty guests: Prof. Ella Diaz, Prof. Greg Londe, and Prof. Shirley Samuels. Prof. Kate McCullough, moderator

November 8, 12:15-1:10pm
English Lounge, 258 Goldwin Smith Hall

How are visual representation and literary representation in conversation with one another? What can images do that words can’t, and vice versa? How do various media engage their audiences’ hearts and minds? Conversation will also draw on our faculty’s guests’ scholarly work on study of murals, comics, and photography.

Books Sandwiched In is a monthly lunch series for Cornell undergraduates. You need not be an English Major to attend. Join in this informal discussion with faculty of literature's relevance to politics, meet other students interested in literature, and get free lunch, too!

Email Corrine at cb624@cornell.edu to reserve your seat, and please include your netID in your reply.



English Department Roundtable: Presenter Katherine Lonsdale Waller
Title: Stars and Angels: The Working Universes of Charlie’s Angels and The Real Housewives of Beverly Hills”
November 10, 2:30pm
English Lounge, 258 Goldwin Smith Hall
Moderator: Zach Price

Copies of the paper are available in the EDR mailbox in the English Department mailroom (GS 250, on the far right of the wall of English grad student boxes) and on the EDR Blackboard site.

Refreshments will be served.

The English Department Roundtable is a forum for graduate students in the English Department to share ideas across a wide variety of fields, time periods, and methodologies.  Open to students at all stages of the program, the EDR gives us an opportunity to discuss our work in an informal setting with a group of our peers, to give and receive feedback about current projects, and to learn about the work being done by our colleagues. At a time in which the tremendous diversity of literary study has made it increasingly difficult to grasp the discipline as a whole, the purpose of the EDR is to foster a greater sense of intellectual community and cohesion within Cornell’s English Department, and to strengthen our work through increased collaboration with our peers.

Sponsored by the Class of 1916 Chair.



In A Word with J. Robert Lennon
"Some Important Third People"
November 15th, 4:30pm
English Lounge, 258 Goldwin Smith Hall

In our age of memoir, social media, and young adult fiction, first person rules the roost. This talk will argue that first person is often misused in American fiction, and that a good writer should always consider third, in all its complex, ungainly glory. Professor Lennon will give examples from literature of third person's flexibility, and show writers how to use it.

In A Word is a new series that showcases the Creative Writing Program’s influences and contributions to the literary world by its dedicated faculty of poets and fiction writers like J. Robert Lennon. The author of eight novels, including Mailman, Familiar, and Broken River, and the story collections Pieces for the Left Hand and See You in Paradise, you can find out more about him at jrobertlennon.com.

Light refreshments provided



The Paul Gottschalk Memorial Lecture by Kim F. Hall (Barnard College)
"Intelligently organized resistance": Shakespeare in the diasporic politics of John E. Bruce
November 30th, 4:30 pm
Guerlac Room, A.D. White House

While scholars gathered at Harvard University to hear noted Shakespearean George Lyman Kittredge outline a program for Shakespeare study and tens of thousands took special trains to attend performances of Caliban in the Yellow Sands at the City University of New York, in 1916 a "Ye Friends of Shakespeare” group convened at a Settlement House on the Lower East Side for its presidential address. Delivered by journalist John E. Bruce, the speech gave this group of black activists and intellectuals (including noted bibliophile Arturo Schomburg) a program for self-directed Shakespeare study within a framework of black advancement and resistance. This lecture situates Bruce’s speech in the cross-hatchings of Shakespeare celebration and anti-racist activism of the early twentieth century. Part of a larger project that explores black archives for links between Shakespeare study and black freedom struggle, this lecture asks: “can we find in these archival fragments a Shakespeare more suitable for twenty-first century America?”

Kim F. Hall will deliver the Gottschalk Memorial Lecture, established in memory of Paul Gottschalk, Professor of English at Cornell, scholar of British Renaissance literature. Hall is the Lucyle Hook Chair of English and Professor of Africana Studies at Barnard College where she teaches courses in Early Modern/ Renaissance Literature, Black Feminist Studies, Critical Race Theory and Food Studies. She is the author of Things of Darkness: Economies of Race and Gender in Early Modern England, Othello: Texts and Contexts and The Sweet Taste of Empire: Sugar, Gender and Material Culture forthcoming with UPenn Press. Professor Hall was the Barnard Library’s inaugural “Faculty Partner of the Year" (2014) and 2015 winner of the College’s Tow Award for Innovative Pedagogy for the Digital Shange project. Diverse Issues in Higher Education named her one of “25 Women Making a Difference in Higher Education and Beyond” in 2016. She is currently working on 'Othello Was My Grandfather': Shakespeare and Race in the African Diaspora for which she has received grants from the NEH, the National Humanities Center and the Schomburg Center for Research in African-American Culture.   

Reception to follow

~ Note the graduate student seminar with Kim F. Hall, offered on December 1, from 12:30-2:00pm ~



Gottschalk Seminar with Kim F. Hall (Barnard College)
"'I didn’t think I would feel like this': Early Modern Race Studies and its Discontents"
December 1st, 12:30-2:00pm
English Lounge, 258 Goldwin Smith Hall

For this seminar Professor Hall will circulate the conclusion to her book, Sweet Taste of Empire: Sugar, Race and Gender in Early Modern England (under contract with the University of Pennsylvania Press) and an excerpt from Robert Appelbaum's Aguecheek's Beef, Belch's Hiccup, and Other Gastronomic Interjections: Literature, Culture, and Food Among the Early Moderns.

The tripartite conclusion first discusses the response by people of color to artist Kara Walker's 2014 blockbuster installation, A Subtlety: The Marvelous Sugar Baby. Professor Hall sees in the black anger at the 2014 installation and in the oblivious responses by (mostly white) spectators a dynamic similar to the ongoing discussion of the presence and meanings of race in early modern literary studies, which helps make visible a racial politics of innocence in both the seventeenth century source materials and contemporary early modern scholarship. Inherent in conflicts over the installation and the Ferguson protests that emerged at the same time is anger at the refusal to hear what blacks have to say about their experience of being raced subjects and to consider that black epistemologies have a salience for historical understanding. The second section briefly juxtaposes Susan Amussen’s reading of English laws regarding slavery in Caribbean Exchanges with Colin Dayan's discussion of English law in The Law is a White Dog to demonstrate the gap between scholarship emerging from the African diaspora and early modern scholarship that refuses dialogue over race. The final section offers a reading of Walker's 2015 follow up exhibit, Afterword, and argues for the need to put race, anger, and healing in the story of early modern studies.

Please RSVP for the seminar by email to: LBL3@cornell.edu. Relevant materials will be emailed to those who RSVP.

~ This graduate student seminar is being offered in conjunction with the Paul Gottschalk Memorial Lecture by Kim F. Hall on November 30th ~

The Gottschalk Memorial Lecture was established in memory of Paul Gottschalk, Professor of English at Cornell, scholar of British Renaissance literature and author of The Meanings of Hamlet (1972). He died in 1977 at the age of 38.


English Department Roundtable: Presenter Sam Lagasse
Title: "The Improbable Indian: Primitivism and Orientalism in Andrew Salkey’s Escape to an Autumn Pavement (1960)"
December 1, 2:30pm
English Lounge, 258 Goldwin Smith Hall
Moderator: TBA

Copies of the paper are available in the EDR mailbox in the English Department mailroom (GS 250, on the far right of the wall of English grad student boxes) and on the EDR Blackboard site.

Refreshments will be served.

The English Department Roundtable is a forum for graduate students in the English Department to share ideas across a wide variety of fields, time periods, and methodologies.  Open to students at all stages of the program, the EDR gives us an opportunity to discuss our work in an informal setting with a group of our peers, to give and receive feedback about current projects, and to learn about the work being done by our colleagues. At a time in which the tremendous diversity of literary study has made it increasingly difficult to grasp the discipline as a whole, the purpose of the EDR is to foster a greater sense of intellectual community and cohesion within Cornell’s English Department, and to strengthen our work through increased collaboration with our peers.

Sponsored by the Class of 1916 Chair.



Spring 2017 Schedule

For a calendar view, please visit the English Events Calendar.

The Department of English is pleased to have purchased carbon offsets for our event guests' travel through the Finger Lakes Climate Fund.



Theorizing the Lyric: The World Novel

February 3, 2:00-5:00pm
Guerlac Room, A.D. White House

February 4, 11:00am-5:00pm
Guerlac Room, A.D. White House

Jonathan Culler's Theory of the Lyric is a serious intervention into how the lyric is conceived, thought, and taught. This conference, organized by professors Elizabeth S. Anker (English) and Grant Farred (Africana Studies), brings together scholars from the U.S., Canada, and Europe to address a series of debates about the theoretical impact and importance of Culler's groundbreaking work, exploring its relevance both to novel studies and to larger conversations about method unfolding within literary criticism and theory.
The conference opens on Friday afternoon and continues on Saturday.

Friday, February 3rd
2:00-2:30
Elizabeth S. Anker (Cornell University), Welcome
Jonathan Culler (Cornell University), Opening remarks

2:30-3:30
David James (Queen Mary-University of London), “In Defense of Lyrical Realism"
3:45-4:45
Ellen Rooney (Brown University), “Change of Address”
Moderator: Tim Murray (Cornell University)

~ Reception to follow ~
 
Saturday, February 4th
11:00-12:00
Robert Caserio (Penn State University), “Wireless: The Novel's Transmissions of Lyric Form”
12:00-1:00
Grant Farred (Cornell University), “This is Not a Fiction: Rankine's Citizen as Mimetic Event”
Moderator: Leslie Adelson (Cornell University)
 
2:00-3:00
Christopher Nealon (Johns Hopkins University), “Some Limits to Antihumanism, or, Problems with the Critique of Meaning”
3:00-4:00
Elizabeth S. Anker (Cornell University), “Beyond Interpretation: Dualism, Postcritical Reading, and Ali Smith’s How To Be Both”
Moderator: Elisha Cohn (Cornell University)
 
4:00-4:30
Ian Balfour (York University), Response
Grant Farred (Cornell University), Closing remarks

~ Light breakfast and lunch provided; reception to follow ~



The Richard Cleaveland Memorial Reading featuring Alice Fulton and Helena María Viramontes 

February 9, 4:30 p.m.
Rhodes-Rawlings Auditorium, G70 Klarman Hall

The Spring 2017 Barbara & David Zalaznick Creative Writing Reading Series kicks off with the Richard Cleaveland Memorial Reading featuring Alice Fulton, poet and writer, and Helena María Viramontes, writer.

The Richard Cleaveland Memorial Reading was created in 2002 by family and friends of Richard Cleaveland, Cornell Class of ’74, to honor his memory.

Reception and book signing to follow in the English Lounge, 258 Goldwin Smith Hall



English Department Roundtable: Marquis Bey
 "The Etc. of Negroes: Transfigurative Blacknesses"
February 10, 2:30pm
English Lounge, 258 Goldwin Smith Hall
Moderator: Gabriella Friedman

Copies of the paper are available in the EDR mailbox in the English Department mailroom (GS 250, on the far right of the wall of English grad student boxes) and on the EDR Blackboard site.

Refreshments will be served.

The English Department Roundtable is a forum for graduate students in the English Department to share ideas across a wide variety of fields, time periods, and methodologies.  Open to students at all stages of the program, the EDR gives us an opportunity to discuss our work in an informal setting with a group of our peers, to give and receive feedback about current projects, and to learn about the work being done by our colleagues. At a time in which the tremendous diversity of literary study has made it increasingly difficult to grasp the discipline as a whole, the purpose of the EDR is to foster a greater sense of intellectual community and cohesion within Cornell’s English Department, and to strengthen our work through increased collaboration with our peers.

Sponsored by the Class of 1916 Chair.



Shop Talk with Manjula Martin, Writer and Editor of Scratch

February 13, 5:00pm
English Lounge, 258 Goldwin Smith Hall

Manjula Martin is editor of the anthology Scratch: Writers, Money, and the Art of Making a Living. She created the blog Who Pays Writers? and was the founder and editor of Scratch magazine, an online periodical about the business of being a writer.

Scratch: Writers, Money, and the Art of Making a Living will be available for purchase.

Complementary light refreshments will also be available.



English Department Roundtable: Emily Rials
"Revising Realism in Zadie Smith's NW"
February 24, 2:30pm
English Lounge, 258 Goldwin Smith Hall
Moderator: Hema Surendranathan

Copies of the paper are available in the EDR mailbox in the English Department mailroom (GS 250, on the far right of the wall of English grad student boxes) and on the EDR Blackboard site.

Refreshments will be served.

The English Department Roundtable is a forum for graduate students in the English Department to share ideas across a wide variety of fields, time periods, and methodologies. Open to students at all stages of the program, the EDR gives us an opportunity to discuss our work in an informal setting with a group of our peers, to give and receive feedback about current projects, and to learn about the work being done by our colleagues. At a time in which the tremendous diversity of literary study has made it increasingly difficult to grasp the discipline as a whole, the purpose of the EDR is to foster a greater sense of intellectual community and cohesion within Cornell’s English Department, and to strengthen our work through increased collaboration with our peers.

Sponsored by the Class of 1916 Chair.



Graduate student seminar with Jodi A. Byrd (U. of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign)

“Gaming Indigeneity”
10:00am-12:00pm, Thursday, March 2nd
English Lounge, 258 Goldwin Smith Hall

RSVP for the seminar by February 23 to LBL3@cornell.edu
Seminar materials will be made available to those who RSVP

~ This seminar is offered in conjunction with the Critical Race Series Lecture with Jodi A. Byrd, also on March 2, at 4:30pm ~



The Critical Race Series Lecture with Jodi A. Byrd (U. of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign)
“Playing Stories: Never Alone, Indigeneity, and the Structures of Settler Colonialism"
March 2, 4:30pm
Hollis E. Cornell Auditorium, 132 Goldwin Smith Hall

Reception to follow in the English Lounge, 258 Goldwin Smith Hall

~ Note the graduate student seminar with Jodi A. Byrd, offered earlier in the day on March 2, from 10am-noon ~



Books Sandwiched In with Cornell Career Services

March 8, 12:15pm
English Lounge, 258 Goldwin Smith Hall

Books Sandwiched In is a monthly lunch series for Cornell undergraduates. You need not be an English Major to attend.

Email Corrine at cb624@cornell.edu to reserve your seat, and please include your netID in your reply.



The Wendy Rosenthal Gellman Lecture on Modern Literature with Douglas Mao (Johns Hopkins)
"Utopia at Fifty"
March 9, 5:00pm -- TIME CHANGED to accommodate college curriculum town hall meeting
Hollis E. Cornell Auditorium, 132 Goldwin Smith Hall

The Gellman Lecture, featuring a distinguished scholar of modern literature, was established by a generous gift from Wendy Rosenthal Gellman ‘81, who majored in English at Cornell

Reception to follow in the English Lounge, 258 Goldwin Smith Hall

~ Note the graduate student seminar with Douglas Mao, offered on March 10, from 10am-noon ~



Graduate student seminar with Douglas Mao (Johns Hopkins)
"Utopia in Motion and Not in Motion (Utopia at One Hundred)"
March 10, 10am-noon
English Lounge, 258 Goldwin Smith Hall

RSVP for the seminar to LBL3@cornell.edu
Seminar materials will be made available to those who RSVP

~ This seminar is offered in conjunction with Wendy Rosenthal Gellman Lecture on Modern Literature with Douglas Mao on March 9, 4:30pm ~



English Department Roundtable: Maddie Reynolds
"The Ironmaster's Alternative Narrative in Bleak House"

March 10, 2:30pm
English Lounge, 258 Goldwin Smith Hall
Moderator: Mint Damrongpiwat

Copies of the paper will be available in the EDR mailbox in the English Department mailroom (GS 250, on the far right of the wall of English grad student boxes) and on the EDR Blackboard site.

Refreshments will be served.

The English Department Roundtable is a forum for graduate students in the English Department to share ideas across a wide variety of fields, time periods, and methodologies. Open to students at all stages of the program, the EDR gives us an opportunity to discuss our work in an informal setting with a group of our peers, to give and receive feedback about current projects, and to learn about the work being done by our colleagues. At a time in which the tremendous diversity of literary study has made it increasingly difficult to grasp the discipline as a whole, the purpose of the EDR is to foster a greater sense of intellectual community and cohesion within Cornell’s English Department, and to strengthen our work through increased collaboration with our peers.

Sponsored by the Class of 1916 Chair.



Lecture with Anna Kornbluh (U. of Illinois, Chicago)
"Snapshots of Political Formalism: William Henry Fox Talbot, Karl Marx, and the Cameras of Collective Life"
March 10, 4:30pm
Guerlac Room, A.D. White House



Reading by Jeff VanderMeer
March 16th, 4:30pm
Rhodes-Rawlings Auditorium, G70 Klarman Hall

Jeff VanderMeer, fiction writer, reads from his work as part of the Spring 2017 Barbara & David Zalaznick Reading Series.

Reception and book signing to follow in the English Lounge, 258 Goldwin Smith Hall



English Department Roundtable: Abram Coetsee
"Was Graffiti Ephemeral? Three episodes from the (an)archive of style-writing in the late demos of New York City, 1965-2013."
March 24, 2:30pm
English Lounge, 258 Goldwin Smith Hall
Moderator: TBA

Copies of the paper will be available in the EDR mailbox in the English Department mailroom (GS 250, on the far right of the wall of English grad student boxes) and on the EDR Blackboard site.

Refreshments will be served.

The English Department Roundtable is a forum for graduate students in the English Department to share ideas across a wide variety of fields, time periods, and methodologies. Open to students at all stages of the program, the EDR gives us an opportunity to discuss our work in an informal setting with a group of our peers, to give and receive feedback about current projects, and to learn about the work being done by our colleagues. At a time in which the tremendous diversity of literary study has made it increasingly difficult to grasp the discipline as a whole, the purpose of the EDR is to foster a greater sense of intellectual community and cohesion within Cornell’s English Department, and to strengthen our work through increased collaboration with our peers.

Sponsored by the Class of 1916 Chair.



The Eamon McEneaney Memorial Reading featuring Eamon Grennan

April 13, 4:30 p.m.
Hollis E. Cornell Auditorium, 132 Goldwin Smith Hall

Poet Eamon Grennan reads from his work as part of the Spring 2017 Barbara & David Zalaznick Reading Series.

This reading is made possible by Eamon McEneaney’s Cornell teammates, family, and friends. In addition to being one of Cornell’s most talented and best-loved athletes, Eamon McEneaney ’77 was a dedicated husband and father, loyal friend, prolific writer and poet, and an American hero. He died on September 11, 2001, in the North Tower of the World Trade Center.

Reception and book signing to follow in the English Lounge, 258 Goldwin Smith Hall



English Department Roundtable: Mint Damrongpiwat
Title: "Fictions of Interiority in Richardson's Clarissa"
April 14, 2:30pm
English Lounge, 258 Goldwin Smith Hall
Moderator: Noah Lloyd

Copies of the paper are available in the EDR mailbox in the English Department mailroom (GS 250, on the far right of the wall of English grad student boxes) and on the EDR Blackboard site.

Refreshments will be served.

The English Department Roundtable is a forum for graduate students in the English Department to share ideas across a wide variety of fields, time periods, and methodologies.  Open to students at all stages of the program, the EDR gives us an opportunity to discuss our work in an informal setting with a group of our peers, to give and receive feedback about current projects, and to learn about the work being done by our colleagues. At a time in which the tremendous diversity of literary study has made it increasingly difficult to grasp the discipline as a whole, the purpose of the EDR is to foster a greater sense of intellectual community and cohesion within Cornell’s English Department, and to strengthen our work through increased collaboration with our peers.

Sponsored by the Class of 1916 Chair.



Reading by Lisa Russ Spaar

April 27, 4:30pm
Rhodes-Rawlings Auditorium, G70 Klarman Hall

Lisa Russ Spaar, poet and essayist, reads from her work as the final installment of the Spring 2017 Barbara & David Zalaznick Reading Series.

Reception and book signing to follow in the English Lounge, 258 Goldwin Smith Hall



In A Word: featuring Lyrae VanClief-Stefanon and Dagmawi Woubshet, In Conversation
May 3, 4:30pm
Rhodes-Rawlings Auditorium, G70 Klarman Hall

In A Word is a new series that showcases the Creative Writing Program’s influences and contributions to the literary world by its dedicated faculty of poets and fiction writers. Poet Lyrae VanClief-Stefanon and scholar Dagmawi Woubshet converse about their work.



MFA Graduation Reading
May 13, 3:00pm
Rhodes-Rawlings Auditorium, G70 Klarman Hall

The Department of English Program in Creative Writing proudly presents the MFA Graduation Reading, featuring:

Rocio Anica, Fiction Writer

Christopher Berardino, Fiction Writer

Mario Giannone, Fiction Writer

Annie (Elizabeth) Goold, Poet

Jasmine Jay, Poet

Shane Kowalski, Fiction Writer

Cary Marcous, Poet

Michael Prior, Poet

Leo Rios, Fiction Writer

Reception to follow in the English Lounge, 258 Goldwin Smith Hall



The Department of English Diploma Ceremony & Reception

May 28, 12noon
Statler Auditorium

Immediately following the Cornell University Commencement Program

Light refreshments will be served
Photography by Grad Images



Fall 2016 Schedule

For a calendar view, please visit the English Events Calendar.



James McConkey: Courting Memory, A 95th Birthday Celebration
September 1st, 4:30pm
Rhodes-Rawlings Auditorium, G70 Klarman Hall

The Fall 2016 Zalaznick Reading Series kicks off with a celebration of Prof. Emeritus James McConkey on the occasion of his 95th birthday. Three of McConkey's award-winning former students will also read from their own works in his honor.

Featuring:
James McConkey, Fiction and Nonfiction Writer
Diane Ackerman ‘78, Poet and Essayist
Gilbert Allen ‘77, Poet and Fiction Writer
A. Manette Ansay ’91, Fiction Writer & Memoirist



Reading by Joy Harjo
September 15th, 4:30pm
Hollis E. Cornell Auditorium, 132 Goldwin Smith Hall

Joy Harjo, poet and memoirist, reads from her works as part of the Fall 2016 Barbara & David Zalaznick Reading Series.



English Department Roundtable: Jesse Goldberg
"The Excessive Present: Historicity, Periodization, and the Anti-Grammar of Ghosts"
September 23rd, 2:30pm
236 Goldwin Smith Hall
Moderator: Verdie Culbreath



The Philip Freund Prize for Creative Writing Alumni Reading: H.G. Carrillo, Sally Wen Mao, Adam O’Fallon Price, & Emily Rosko
September 29th, 4:30pm
Rhodes-Rawlings Auditorium, G70 Klarman Hall

Dept. of English MFA alumni H.G. Carrillo (fiction), Sally Wen Mao (poetry), Adam O’Fallon Price (fiction), & Emily Rosko (poetry) read from their works as part of the Fall 2016 Barbara & David Zalaznick Reading Series.

Featuring:
H.G. Carrillo ‘07, Fiction Writer
Sally Wen Mao ‘12, Poet
Adam O’Fallon Price ‘14, Fiction Writer
Emily Rosko ‘03, Poet



Reading by David Madden
October 13th, 4:30pm
Hollis E. Cornell Auditorium, 132 Goldwin Smith Hall

David Madden, fiction and nonfiction writer, reads from his works as part of the Fall 2016 Barbara & David Zalaznick Reading Series.



English Department Roundtable: Gabriella Friedman
"Cultivating America: Colonial History in the Morrisonian Wilderness"
October 14th, 2:30pm
English Lounge, 258 Goldwin Smith Hall
Moderator: Jesse Goldberg



First-Year MFA Reading Series
October 14th, 5:00pm
Buffalo Street Books

MFA program features new writers Cristina Correa (poetry) and Neal Giannone (fiction), as they read fiction and poetry selections!



M.H. Abrams Lecture with Seth Lerer
“The English Lyric: Medieval to Early Modern”
October 20th, 4:30 pm
Hollis E. Cornell Auditorium, 132 Goldwin Smith Hall
Reception to follow in the English Lounge (GS 258)

The M.H. Abrams Visiting Professorship was established in 2006 by Stephen H. Weiss ('57) in honor of Meyer H. “Mike" Abrams, late Class of 1916 Professor, Emeritus. Seth Lerer is the Fall 2016 M.H. Abrams Distinguished Visiting Professor.



First-Year MFA Reading Series
October 21st, 5:00pm
Buffalo Street Books

MFA program features new writers Weena Pun (fiction), Christopher Berardino (fiction), & Lyndsey Warren (poetry), as they read fiction and poetry selections!



The Paul Gottschalk Memorial Lecture with Jeffrey Masten
“Christopher Marlowe’s Queer Reformations: Heresy, Theory, Book History”
October 27th, 4:30 pm
Hollis E. Cornell Auditorium, 132 Goldwin Smith Hall
Reception to follow in the English Lounge (GS 258)

Jeffrey Masten (Northwestern University) delivers the Gottschalk Memorial Lecture, established in memory of Paul Gottschalk, Professor of English at Cornell, scholar of British Renaissance literature.



Gottschalk Seminar with Jeffrey Masten
“On Queer Philologies”
October 27th, 12:00 pm
English Lounge, 258 Goldwin Smith Hall

Graduate Student seminar with Jeffrey Masten (Northwestern University). This seminar is being offered in conjunction with the Paul Gottschalk Memorial Lecture by Jeffrey Masten at 4:30pm in HEC Auditorium (GSH 132).



English Department Roundtable: Laura Francis
"The Rules of the Game: Allegory and Space in A Game at Chess"
October 28th, 2:30pm
English Lounge, 258 Goldwin Smith Hall
Moderator: Stephen Kim



Reading by Chris Abani
November 3rd, 4:30pm
Rhodes-Rawlings Auditorium, G70 Klarman Hall

Chris Abani, poet and writer, reads from his works as part of the Fall 2016 Barbara & David Zalaznick Reading Series.



Forms, Figures, and Difference: A Conference in Honor of Fredric Bogel
November 4th, 4:30 pm
English Lounge, 258 Goldwin Smith Hall
Reception to follow in the Pale Fire Lounge

Exploring the texts, forms, genres, and critical approaches that Rick Bogel has brought to literary theory and to eighteenth-century studies and beyond, this conference includes presentations of new work as well as panels that reflect and develop Rick’s contribution. The conference opens on Friday afternoon and continues for a full day on Saturday.

Featuring:
Neil Saccamano (Cornell University), Welcome
Suvir Kaul (University of Pennsylvania), “Apostrophe As a Theory of History”
David Alvarez (DePauw University), “Enlightenment Theologies of Satire”
Moderator: Laura Brown (Cornell University)



Forms, Figures, and Difference: A Conference in Honor of Fredric Bogel
November 5th, 9:30am
English Lounge, 258 Goldwin Smith Hall
Light breakfast and lunch provided

Exploring the texts, forms, genres, and critical approaches that Rick Bogel has brought to literary theory and to eighteenth-century studies and beyond, this conference includes presentations of new work as well as panels that reflect and develop Rick’s contribution. The conference opens on Friday afternoon and continues for a full day on Saturday.

Featuring:
9:30-11:00
Mark Blackwell (University of Hartford), “‘Less’ning as he soars’: Epic and Mock-Epic, 1660-1714"
Jess Keiser (Tufts University), “Materialism in the Dunciad
Moderator: Laura Brown (Cornell University)
 
11:00-12:30
Sarah Eron (University of Rhode Island), “Wistful Thinking”
Sarah Ensor (Portland State University), “Willa Cather and the Grammar of the Unrealized”
Moderator: Harry Shaw (Cornell University)
 
1:30-3:00
Meghan Freeman (Manhattanville College), “'All This Vast Wreck': Strategies of Aesthetic Recuperation in Middlemarch
Shilo McGiff (Independent Scholar), “Little Greens: Joni Mitchell, Virginia Woolf, and the Poetics of Pastoral”
Moderator: Harry Shaw (Cornell University)
 
3:00-4:30
Dwight Codr (University of Connecticut), “Reading and Allusion: Pope and Mackenzie”
Stephanie DeGooyer (Willamette University), “The Politics of Form”
Moderator: Neil Saccamano (Cornell University)
 
5:00-6:00
Roundtable with Meghan Freeman, Suvir Kaul, Jess Keiser,and Shilo McGiff



First-Year MFA Reading Series
November 10th, 5:00pm
Buffalo Street Books

MFA program features new writers Hema Surendranathan (fiction) & Emily Rosello Mercurio (poetry), as they read fiction and poetry selections!



English Department Roundtable: Katherine Thorsteinson
"National Roots and Diasporic Routes: Tracing the Flying African Myth in Canada"
November 11th, 2:30pm
English Lounge, 258 Goldwin Smith Hall
Moderator: Brianna Thompson



In A Word with Ernesto Quiñonez
“The Fingerprints of Influence”
November 16th, 4:30pm
English Lounge, 258 Goldwin Smith Hall

In A Word is a new series that showcases the Creative Writing Program’s influences and contributions to the literary world by its dedicated faculty of poets and fiction writers like Ernesto Quiñonez. 



First-Year MFA Reading Series
November 17th, 5:00pm
Buffalo Street Books

MFA program features new writers Shakarean Hutchinson (fiction), Carl Moon (poetry), & Peter Gilbert (fiction), as they read fiction and poetry selections!



English Department Roundtable: Amber Harding
"'But so it is': Contradictions of Optimism & Doubt in James Agee's Let Us Now Praise Famous Men”
December 2nd, 2:30pm
English Lounge, 258 Goldwin Smith Hall
Moderator: TBA